WEBVTT FILE 1 00:00:00.500 --> 00:00:17.000 [Music] 2 00:00:17.500 --> 00:00:22.000 >> What's new in Windows Server 2012 R2. We can actually... 3 00:00:22.500 --> 00:00:25.000 this has been a significant upgrade to the studios. You can 4 00:00:25.500 --> 00:00:25.000 see what is going on. 5 00:00:25.500 --> 00:00:25.000 this has been a significant upgrade to the studios. You can 6 00:00:25.500 --> 00:00:28.000 >> It's significant. And we can see what's going on, and apparently 7 00:00:28.500 --> 00:00:28.000 so can everybody else. 8 00:00:28.500 --> 00:00:32.000 >> I know. So if you're out there you can hear us, hello. 9 00:00:32.500 --> 00:00:35.000 Nice to see you. Thanks very much for sticking around for a couple 10 00:00:35.500 --> 00:00:37.000 of different issues that we went and worked through. 11 00:00:37.500 --> 00:00:40.000 Apparently somebody crossed the streams and things were strange. 12 00:00:40.500 --> 00:00:43.000 So we're back. We're here. We're going to be going through all 13 00:00:43.500 --> 00:00:47.000 day today and also day tomorrow. If it's morning where you are, 14 00:00:47.500 --> 00:00:47.000 evening or afternoon or anything in between, good morning, good 15 00:00:47.500 --> 00:00:47.000 day today and also day tomorrow. If it's morning where you are, 16 00:00:47.500 --> 00:00:50.000 evening or afternoon or anything in between, good morning, good 17 00:00:50.500 --> 00:00:54.000 evening, hello. And welcome. Are you ready, man. I am. I'm stoked. 18 00:00:54.500 --> 00:00:54.000 >> I am. 19 00:00:54.500 --> 00:00:55.000 >> This is a big thing, man. 20 00:00:55.500 --> 00:00:59.000 >> First of all, anyone that's on the stream that watched over 21 00:00:59.500 --> 00:01:02.000 the last 30 odd minutes that we were going through, you guys 22 00:01:02.500 --> 00:01:04.000 are funny. 23 00:01:04.500 --> 00:01:04.000 You guys are funny. 24 00:01:04.500 --> 00:01:06.000 >> The chat room is on fire. We love it. 25 00:01:06.500 --> 00:01:10.000 >> We were cracking up in here. You guys, we were in tears. 26 00:01:10.500 --> 00:01:12.000 My compliments to the AV guys in the back. 27 00:01:12.500 --> 00:01:12.000 >> Oh, yeah. 28 00:01:12.500 --> 00:01:16.000 >> Because the last 30 minutes of their lives were exciting. 29 00:01:16.500 --> 00:01:19.000 >> Yes. I will say they had challenges to say the at least. 30 00:01:19.500 --> 00:01:22.000 They had challenges. But hey, we're here, and we're good to go. 31 00:01:22.500 --> 00:01:25.000 And we're going to be talking about Windows Server 2012 R2, what's 32 00:01:25.500 --> 00:01:28.000 new inside that particular solution. And it's only been out 33 00:01:28.500 --> 00:01:30.000 for a couple of weeks. It's crazy. 34 00:01:30.500 --> 00:01:31.000 >> Couple of weeks. 35 00:01:31.500 --> 00:01:33.000 >> Couple of weeks. Almost less than that. 36 00:01:33.500 --> 00:01:33.000 >> Yeah. 37 00:01:33.500 --> 00:01:35.000 >> I guess you can say many. In case you haven't met me before, 38 00:01:35.500 --> 00:01:37.000 my name is Rick Claus. I'm a senior technical evangelist here 39 00:01:37.500 --> 00:01:39.000 at Microsoft. I've basically been working in the I.T. 40 00:01:39.500 --> 00:01:43.000 industry about 20 odd years. I was the guy that sat in front 41 00:01:43.500 --> 00:01:46.000 of the computer and had 42 00:01:46.500 --> 00:01:48.000 it was an HP 4L. 43 00:01:48.500 --> 00:01:50.000 Remember those. Really long time ago. 44 00:01:50.500 --> 00:01:53.000 >> Yeah. They were later in my career. 45 00:01:53.500 --> 00:01:57.000 >> I know. Been doing an awful lot of stuff. I'm the guy that 46 00:01:57.500 --> 00:02:02.000 basically one of the server people here in Microsoft for server 2012. 47 00:02:02.500 --> 00:02:04.000 And super stoked, and I'm joined by Mr. Corey Hynes. 48 00:02:04.500 --> 00:02:10.000 >> How you doing, everybody? I'm Corey. I'm a crusty old geek. 49 00:02:10.500 --> 00:02:11.000 >> Nice. 50 00:02:11.500 --> 00:02:15.000 >> I've been around, Rick says I've been around for 20 years. 51 00:02:15.500 --> 00:02:16.000 I claim I've been around for 15 years. 52 00:02:16.500 --> 00:02:18.000 >> Yeah. 53 00:02:18.500 --> 00:02:20.000 >> In reality it's probably a little bit longer than that since 54 00:02:20.500 --> 00:02:22.000 I started tinkering with this stuff. 55 00:02:22.500 --> 00:02:25.000 What I am, I'm a hose ter. 56 00:02:25.500 --> 00:02:30.000 We do hosting for hyper-V, training for labs, for classrooms 57 00:02:30.500 --> 00:02:31.000 that kind of stuff. 58 00:02:31.500 --> 00:02:35.000 And in my spare time do this kind of stuff. So work with Microsoft 59 00:02:35.500 --> 00:02:39.000 to produce different types of educational marketing content, 60 00:02:39.500 --> 00:02:43.000 and you know really an early adopter of just about everything. 61 00:02:43.500 --> 00:02:46.000 I'm the leading Edge. I'm one of the few that I get access to 62 00:02:46.500 --> 00:02:48.000 the bits before you do. 63 00:02:48.500 --> 00:02:48.000 >> I know. 64 00:02:48.500 --> 00:02:48.000 the bits before you do. 65 00:02:48.500 --> 00:02:48.000 the bits before you do. 66 00:02:48.500 --> 00:02:49.000 >> I don't want to hear that. 67 00:02:49.500 --> 00:02:52.000 >> It's a point of jealousy. 68 00:02:52.500 --> 00:02:55.000 Hey, Rick have you seen? No, no, I haven't. 69 00:02:55.500 --> 00:02:58.000 >> So in case you haven't already done it, you can obviously go 70 00:02:58.500 --> 00:03:03.000 to the technetMicrosoft/eval and go and download a copy of server 71 00:03:03.500 --> 00:03:08.000 2012 R2 as well as Systems Center 2012 R2 as well. 72 00:03:08.500 --> 00:03:08.000 >> Absolutely. 73 00:03:08.500 --> 00:03:10.000 >> They're both in prerelease so you should not be using them 74 00:03:10.500 --> 00:03:12.000 inside of production environment. You don't have a Lance to 75 00:03:12.500 --> 00:03:15.000 do so. And also there is... we've already stated there is no 76 00:03:15.500 --> 00:03:18.000 upgrade path from the preview to the finals. 77 00:03:18.500 --> 00:03:18.000 >> Yeah. 78 00:03:18.500 --> 00:03:21.000 >> So you'll have to do a migration of the data and/or reinstall 79 00:03:21.500 --> 00:03:23.000 if you decide to use that production. Generally keep it for 80 00:03:23.500 --> 00:03:26.000 the lab, get used to it, and go and understand what we're going 81 00:03:26.500 --> 00:03:29.000 to be doing for the rest of this week. You can follow along 82 00:03:29.500 --> 00:03:29.000 if you want. 83 00:03:29.500 --> 00:03:33.000 >> And everything we're doing here is running on the preview builds 84 00:03:33.500 --> 00:03:33.000 of everything. 85 00:03:33.500 --> 00:03:33.000 >> And everything we're doing here is running on the preview builds 86 00:03:33.500 --> 00:03:33.000 >> And everything we're doing here is running on the preview builds 87 00:03:33.500 --> 00:03:33.000 >> Yes. 88 00:03:33.500 --> 00:03:37.000 >> So fingers crossed all bets are off. No guarantees. 89 00:03:37.500 --> 00:03:37.000 We're going to kind of do our best and show you as much as we 90 00:03:37.500 --> 00:03:37.000 >> So fingers crossed all bets are off. No guarantees. 91 00:03:37.500 --> 00:03:40.000 We're going to kind of do our best and show you as much as we 92 00:03:40.500 --> 00:03:40.000 can and as many different things as we can as we kind of work 93 00:03:40.500 --> 00:03:42.000 can and as many different things as we can as we kind of work 94 00:03:42.500 --> 00:03:47.000 through not only the what's specifically new, but some of the 95 00:03:47.500 --> 00:03:49.000 foundationals for 2012 as well. 96 00:03:49.500 --> 00:03:49.000 >> You got it. 97 00:03:49.500 --> 00:03:53.000 >> One of the things I learned... so we just came back from two 98 00:03:53.500 --> 00:03:55.000 events, North America and Europe. I did a couple of preconference 99 00:03:55.500 --> 00:03:59.000 seminars in Tech Ed. So this is kind of Europeans versus the 100 00:03:59.500 --> 00:04:01.000 north Americans. Now, you know the heck with the rest of the 101 00:04:01.500 --> 00:04:04.000 world, I'm kidding. So in terms of the Europeans versions the 102 00:04:04.500 --> 00:04:08.000 North Americans I had about 250 people in each session and so 103 00:04:08.500 --> 00:04:11.000 one of the first questions they asked how many people have deployed 104 00:04:11.500 --> 00:04:15.000 and are running 2012? Because it was the session was on 2012, 105 00:04:15.500 --> 00:04:15.000 not R2. It was the foundational day of 2012. And in North America, 106 00:04:15.500 --> 00:04:15.000 and are running 2012? Because it was the session was on 2012, 107 00:04:15.500 --> 00:04:21.000 not R2. It was the foundational day of 2012. And in North America, 108 00:04:21.500 --> 00:04:25.000 we had about 3 percent of the room that said they were running 2012. 109 00:04:25.500 --> 00:04:26.000 >> Uh-huh. 110 00:04:26.500 --> 00:04:28.000 >> In Europe we had about 75 percent of the room that said they 111 00:04:28.500 --> 00:04:29.000 were running on 2012. 112 00:04:29.500 --> 00:04:30.000 >> Nice. Early adopters. 113 00:04:30.500 --> 00:04:34.000 >> I don't know what that means. Sort of an interesting thing, 114 00:04:34.500 --> 00:04:38.000 and what surprised me a little because I expected more people 115 00:04:38.500 --> 00:04:43.000 to be adopting 2012 and more people have familiarity with 2012, 116 00:04:43.500 --> 00:04:47.000 and thing to kind of remember is that R2 is a significant release. 117 00:04:47.500 --> 00:04:51.000 There's a lot in here but it builds on the foundation of 2012 118 00:04:51.500 --> 00:04:56.000 and if you don't have a solid foundation for 2012 a lot of what's 119 00:04:56.500 --> 00:04:59.000 in our R2 is going to be really meaningless and pointless to 120 00:04:59.500 --> 00:05:01.000 you because you're not going to see the difference or know what 121 00:05:01.500 --> 00:05:02.000 the difference is. 122 00:05:02.500 --> 00:05:02.000 >> Right. 123 00:05:02.500 --> 00:05:07.000 >> Some of it's obvious. Some of it is just incremental subtle 124 00:05:07.500 --> 00:05:09.000 but very significant changes. 125 00:05:09.500 --> 00:05:09.000 >> Right. 126 00:05:09.500 --> 00:05:13.000 >> So big recommendation is you know, before you start really 127 00:05:13.500 --> 00:05:17.000 diving in R2 make sure you've got a good solid foundation for 128 00:05:17.500 --> 00:05:19.000 2012 and a really good way to do that is to look at what we did 129 00:05:19.500 --> 00:05:20.000 last year. 130 00:05:20.500 --> 00:05:25.000 >> Right. We did this on 2012 and about the same sort of time 131 00:05:25.500 --> 00:05:26.000 in the release time frame. 132 00:05:26.500 --> 00:05:27.000 >> It was a preview as well. 133 00:05:27.500 --> 00:05:30.000 >> It was a preview. There was a little bit I think about a month 134 00:05:30.500 --> 00:05:33.000 or two where we had to kind get things ready as opposed to a 135 00:05:33.500 --> 00:05:36.000 week or so for this one. 136 00:05:36.500 --> 00:05:38.000 >> Certainly you take a look at that and that gives you a really 137 00:05:38.500 --> 00:05:41.000 solid 2012 foundation that's going to make a lot of the stuff 138 00:05:41.500 --> 00:05:41.000 that's in R2 be even that much impressive and make a lot more sense. 139 00:05:41.500 --> 00:05:41.000 solid 2012 foundation that's going to make a lot of the stuff 140 00:05:41.500 --> 00:05:45.000 that's in R2 be even that much impressive and make a lot more sense. 141 00:05:45.500 --> 00:05:48.000 >> Right. I notice in the chat room there's been a couple of questions 142 00:05:48.500 --> 00:05:50.000 in case you don't know in the right-hand side there's a small 143 00:05:50.500 --> 00:05:53.000 chat window. If you're interested you can actually go with the 144 00:05:53.500 --> 00:05:56.000 multimonitor set-up, and click to expand to make it a large chat 145 00:05:56.500 --> 00:05:58.000 room be able to see stuff. There's already been some questions 146 00:05:58.500 --> 00:06:00.000 about license and libraries and that sort of stuff. 147 00:06:00.500 --> 00:06:06.000 Basically 2012 R2, Server 2012 R2 is a separate license to be 148 00:06:06.500 --> 00:06:09.000 able to buy or unless you have SA you would have rights to be 149 00:06:09.500 --> 00:06:12.000 able to use it when it goes into production. But you do not 150 00:06:12.500 --> 00:06:17.000 yet have cals for end points. It's only for your users. You only 151 00:06:17.500 --> 00:06:21.000 need to have a license to run the server in R2 as opposed to 152 00:06:21.500 --> 00:06:24.000 when Windows Server 2012. That's the one thing I stated before. 153 00:06:24.500 --> 00:06:26.000 It's good for you guys to know. I flipped to my slides for a 154 00:06:26.500 --> 00:06:29.000 minute, and I've got some assumed knowledge that we kind of talked 155 00:06:29.500 --> 00:06:32.000 about so you mentioned very, very rightly so you were assuming 156 00:06:32.500 --> 00:06:35.000 that you have at least taken a look at server 2012. If not go 157 00:06:35.500 --> 00:06:39.000 to Microsoft academy.com and take a look at some of the content there. 158 00:06:39.500 --> 00:06:41.000 Take a look at some of the jump start that we did last year about 159 00:06:41.500 --> 00:06:45.000 server 2012. At minimum we're also assuming you have 2008 R2 160 00:06:45.500 --> 00:06:47.000 experience and you're the type of person that basically gets 161 00:06:47.500 --> 00:06:50.000 in there and in stalls, cun figs, and plays and works with this 162 00:06:50.500 --> 00:06:54.000 environment on a regular basis. You have some basic D.N.S. 163 00:06:54.500 --> 00:06:57.000 information as well. Understanding how D.N.S. goes off and works. 164 00:06:57.500 --> 00:07:00.000 And you have obviously some experience with the power shell. 165 00:07:00.500 --> 00:07:03.000 Virtualization, and day-to-day management experience. 166 00:07:03.500 --> 00:07:06.000 Now, from an agenda we're going to be covering today despite 167 00:07:06.500 --> 00:07:09.000 our slightly delayed start we will be still covering this full 168 00:07:09.500 --> 00:07:11.000 agenda before everything happens to go. 169 00:07:11.500 --> 00:07:17.000 We will be taking a look at Windows Server 2012 R2 as an overview 170 00:07:17.500 --> 00:07:20.000 so the very first module is going to cover touching on a couple 171 00:07:20.500 --> 00:07:23.000 of points on all the other sections. So if you can only stay 172 00:07:23.500 --> 00:07:26.000 for one session which I hope you can stay for the whole day, 173 00:07:26.500 --> 00:07:29.000 if you can only stay for one session, the first one, that we're 174 00:07:29.500 --> 00:07:29.000 doing right now is the one to basically to be able to stay for. 175 00:07:29.500 --> 00:07:29.000 if you can only stay for one session, the first one, that we're 176 00:07:29.500 --> 00:07:31.000 doing right now is the one to basically to be able to stay for. 177 00:07:31.500 --> 00:07:36.000 Then we go into much more depth into virtualization, into networking, 178 00:07:36.500 --> 00:07:39.000 and into storage is what we're covering today, and then tomorrow 179 00:07:39.500 --> 00:07:43.000 we're going to be covering management automation, VDI infrastructure, 180 00:07:43.500 --> 00:07:45.000 taking a little bit of a break for lunch and then we're going 181 00:07:45.500 --> 00:07:48.000 to cover access information and/or AIP is what I like to call 182 00:07:48.500 --> 00:07:50.000 it internally and then finally wrapping up with some web apps 183 00:07:50.500 --> 00:07:53.000 stuff as well. And everything else as well. 184 00:07:53.500 --> 00:07:57.000 >> And so if I were to kind of sort of step back for a second, 185 00:07:57.500 --> 00:08:01.000 and look at the entire outline, pay particular attention to storage. 186 00:08:01.500 --> 00:08:02.000 >> Yes. 187 00:08:02.500 --> 00:08:06.000 >> Because starting with Windows Server 2012 the way you think 188 00:08:06.500 --> 00:08:09.000 about storage in Windows, the way you think about storage in 189 00:08:09.500 --> 00:08:12.000 your infrastructure, the way you think about storage in general, 190 00:08:12.500 --> 00:08:14.000 fundamentally changes. 191 00:08:14.500 --> 00:08:15.000 >> Uh-huh. 192 00:08:15.500 --> 00:08:19.000 >> And this is the first release of Windows where... 193 00:08:19.500 --> 00:08:21.000 I've been working with Windows since land manager days. 194 00:08:21.500 --> 00:08:26.000 This is the first release of Windows where you can fundamentally 195 00:08:26.500 --> 00:08:30.000 re-architect the way you build a data center because of what 196 00:08:30.500 --> 00:08:31.000 they've put in the product. 197 00:08:31.500 --> 00:08:31.000 >> Yeah. 198 00:08:31.500 --> 00:08:34.000 >> And it has to do with cloud and this revolves around cloud 199 00:08:34.500 --> 00:08:40.000 and the increase in multitendency across-the-board. Pay particular 200 00:08:40.500 --> 00:08:43.000 attention to the storage components, not just what we do here, 201 00:08:43.500 --> 00:08:46.000 which is some of the enhancements, but the fundamental storage 202 00:08:46.500 --> 00:08:49.000 changes around highly available file sir versus, and file clusters 203 00:08:49.500 --> 00:08:51.000 and all that stuff from 2012 in general. 204 00:08:51.500 --> 00:08:54.000 >> Yep. And again we'll be jumping back and forth between some 205 00:08:54.500 --> 00:08:57.000 slide ware to give you some background and getting into a little 206 00:08:57.500 --> 00:09:00.000 bit of a diagramming thing if you still have the ability to go 207 00:09:00.500 --> 00:09:03.000 off and do some diagrams on that lovely touch based monitor. 208 00:09:03.500 --> 00:09:03.000 >> I do. 209 00:09:03.500 --> 00:09:06.000 >> And just to head off the questions everyone always asks what 210 00:09:06.500 --> 00:09:09.000 are these monitors. They are touch based monitors from Y.com 211 00:09:09.500 --> 00:09:15.000 that are plugged into some laptops. Did I get the wrong name already. 212 00:09:15.500 --> 00:09:17.000 They're Playnom, sorry. 213 00:09:17.500 --> 00:09:22.000 And they plug in some laptops off to the side and so they're 214 00:09:22.500 --> 00:09:25.000 not all in one. It's simply an add on you can get yourself. 215 00:09:25.500 --> 00:09:25.000 We have them tilted at this weird angle that we're trying to 216 00:09:25.500 --> 00:09:25.000 not all in one. It's simply an add on you can get yourself. 217 00:09:25.500 --> 00:09:26.000 We have them tilted at this weird angle that we're trying to 218 00:09:26.500 --> 00:09:27.000 get used to. 219 00:09:27.500 --> 00:09:30.000 >> As I found out as I tried to deploy a USB stick in it. 220 00:09:30.500 --> 00:09:31.000 There's no ports. 221 00:09:31.500 --> 00:09:34.000 >> It's a monitor. It's a monitor. 222 00:09:34.500 --> 00:09:38.000 So shall we get started, my friend? Any last closing comments 223 00:09:38.500 --> 00:09:39.000 before we get started? 224 00:09:39.500 --> 00:09:40.000 >> No, not really. 225 00:09:40.500 --> 00:09:43.000 >> You can go ahead ahead. I'll sit back and relax and enjoy the show. 226 00:09:43.500 --> 00:09:47.000 >> Nice. I do want to put this slide up for a minute, give you 227 00:09:47.500 --> 00:09:50.000 a guys a reminder some of the resources we had. You'll see this 228 00:09:50.500 --> 00:09:52.000 slide come up with a number of times. 229 00:09:52.500 --> 00:09:58.000 If you're on the Twitter MVA Jumpstart is one that comes up in 230 00:09:58.500 --> 00:10:01.000 the sidebar and then if you take a look at some other streams 231 00:10:01.500 --> 00:10:04.000 I have another one open here that is up in the corner, which 232 00:10:04.500 --> 00:10:07.000 is WS2012R2JS 233 00:10:07.500 --> 00:10:10.000 as one way that I follow what the heck is going on. 234 00:10:10.500 --> 00:10:14.000 >> You can Twitter to Rick or myself directly or 235 00:10:14.500 --> 00:10:18.000 breaking news. You can Twitter Rick's hat. 236 00:10:18.500 --> 00:10:20.000 >> Yes. Someone created a Twitter account. 237 00:10:20.500 --> 00:10:23.000 >> There's a Twitter account for Rick's hat. So if you want to 238 00:10:23.500 --> 00:10:27.000 know what life is like sitting up there 239 00:10:27.500 --> 00:10:29.000 you can Twitter Rick's hat and I'm sure it will tell you all 240 00:10:29.500 --> 00:10:32.000 sorts of weird and interesting things. I've always wondered 241 00:10:32.500 --> 00:10:34.000 what keeps moving around under there because I keep seeing it 242 00:10:34.500 --> 00:10:37.000 shift around on your head when your hands are not touching it. 243 00:10:37.500 --> 00:10:40.000 >> You guys are killing me. Back on the slide again. There are 244 00:10:40.500 --> 00:10:42.000 some other resource links there in case you want to download 245 00:10:42.500 --> 00:10:48.000 a copy of the Windows Server 2012 R2 preview, AKA.MS/WS2012R2 246 00:10:48.500 --> 00:10:55.000 And also systems center 2012 R2 preview is AKA.MS/SCR2012. 247 00:10:55.500 --> 00:10:57.000 And then like I was mentioned before there's a large amount of 248 00:10:57.500 --> 00:11:00.000 information available for on demand stuff and this will actually 249 00:11:00.500 --> 00:11:05.000 appear on demand there as well at Microsoftvirtualacademy.com 250 00:11:05.500 --> 00:11:08.000 and a plug for my friend Simon Perriman. He has a jump Stuart 251 00:11:08.500 --> 00:11:11.000 coming up next week specifically on systems center 2012 R2 like 252 00:11:11.500 --> 00:11:17.000 this one on July 15th and you can register at AKA.MS/SCRR2JS. 253 00:11:17.500 --> 00:11:21.000 >> We're going to do a little bit with virtual machine manager 254 00:11:21.500 --> 00:11:24.000 over the next two days because it's such an integral part of 255 00:11:24.500 --> 00:11:26.000 the storage networking, and virtualization. 256 00:11:26.500 --> 00:11:26.000 >> Yep. 257 00:11:26.500 --> 00:11:28.000 >> Which is part of Windows. 258 00:11:28.500 --> 00:11:29.000 >> It's your fabric control. 259 00:11:29.500 --> 00:11:33.000 >> We're not going into depth on VMM. We're going to kind of 260 00:11:33.500 --> 00:11:36.000 glaze it over a little bit. So if you're looking at some of the 261 00:11:36.500 --> 00:11:39.000 VMM stuff, and but what is that. That's what Simon is going 262 00:11:39.500 --> 00:11:42.000 to do next week. He'll go deep into it. You'll get a little 263 00:11:42.500 --> 00:11:46.000 taste of it here. As we kind of point out you know as an example 264 00:11:46.500 --> 00:11:49.000 some of the components of hyper-V are only manageable through 265 00:11:49.500 --> 00:11:49.000 VMM now. 266 00:11:49.500 --> 00:11:49.000 some of the components of hyper-V are only manageable through 267 00:11:49.500 --> 00:11:50.000 >> Yep. 268 00:11:50.500 --> 00:11:50.000 >> Some of those more abstract and complex functions like net 269 00:11:50.500 --> 00:11:50.000 >> Yep. 270 00:11:50.500 --> 00:11:53.000 >> Some of those more abstract and complex functions like net 271 00:11:53.500 --> 00:11:55.000 word virtualization, for example, they don't do anything in the 272 00:11:55.500 --> 00:12:01.000 UI in Windows. It's 100% in the UI in VMM so we'll kind of glaze 273 00:12:01.500 --> 00:12:03.000 through a little bit of that and as you get... they'll get more 274 00:12:03.500 --> 00:12:04.000 into that next week. 275 00:12:04.500 --> 00:12:09.000 >> I see from our lovely chat back and forth it's a planar monitor, 276 00:12:09.500 --> 00:12:15.000 VC 2785 in case you were interested. We'll go on from there. 277 00:12:15.500 --> 00:12:18.000 But let's go and take a look at the slides here to give you a 278 00:12:18.500 --> 00:12:20.000 bit of the agenda for the first section here. We're going to 279 00:12:20.500 --> 00:12:24.000 be looking at some background what the cloud OS is and how that 280 00:12:24.500 --> 00:12:26.000 works from a Microsoft perspective and what we're calling in 281 00:12:26.500 --> 00:12:30.000 Server 2012 R2. We'll look to some of the challenges customers 282 00:12:30.500 --> 00:12:33.000 are facing these days and then more importantly we bring into 283 00:12:33.500 --> 00:12:36.000 each of the major sections we're going to be talking about today. 284 00:12:36.500 --> 00:12:40.000 >> So bottom line, guys, if you watch nothing else and you kind 285 00:12:40.500 --> 00:12:40.000 of want a quick hit, R2, what is it, what's the big deal, this 286 00:12:40.500 --> 00:12:40.000 >> So bottom line, guys, if you watch nothing else and you kind 287 00:12:40.500 --> 00:12:43.000 of want a quick hit, R2, what is it, what's the big deal, this 288 00:12:43.500 --> 00:12:44.000 is the one to watch. 289 00:12:44.500 --> 00:12:45.000 >> You got it. 290 00:12:45.500 --> 00:12:47.000 >> We'd like you hanging around the rest of the day. But this 291 00:12:47.500 --> 00:12:47.000 is kind of the one to watch if you wanted the big deal with R2. 292 00:12:47.500 --> 00:12:47.000 >> We'd like you hanging around the rest of the day. But this 293 00:12:47.500 --> 00:12:51.000 is kind of the one to watch if you wanted the big deal with R2. 294 00:12:51.500 --> 00:12:54.000 >> And if you besides interacting on the Twitter side of things 295 00:12:54.500 --> 00:12:57.000 you obviously have a chat availability. We have a whole team 296 00:12:57.500 --> 00:13:00.000 of people from around the world answering questions about Server 297 00:13:00.500 --> 00:13:02.000 2012 R2. 298 00:13:02.500 --> 00:13:05.000 Both MVP's and Microsoft employees and also members of the product 299 00:13:05.500 --> 00:13:09.000 team are there as well. We're there as well as there when we're 300 00:13:09.500 --> 00:13:12.000 not talking at this point in time. So don't forget the chat 301 00:13:12.500 --> 00:13:15.000 room there too. So back in the slides for a second here just 302 00:13:15.500 --> 00:13:15.000 looking at some transformational trends. Basically there's a 303 00:13:15.500 --> 00:13:15.000 room there too. So back in the slides for a second here just 304 00:13:15.500 --> 00:13:17.000 looking at some transformational trends. Basically there's a 305 00:13:17.500 --> 00:13:17.000 whole realm of basic trends that are going inside the industry 306 00:13:17.500 --> 00:13:22.000 whole realm of basic trends that are going inside the industry 307 00:13:22.500 --> 00:13:26.000 right now with regards to cloud computing. Consumerization with 308 00:13:26.500 --> 00:13:28.000 bringing in your own devices, big massive amounts of data explosion 309 00:13:28.500 --> 00:13:31.000 that's going on and basically if you've tend to break down how 310 00:13:31.500 --> 00:13:33.000 people are looking at data centers, and how people are looking 311 00:13:33.500 --> 00:13:38.000 at their environment these days, you can think of it regardless 312 00:13:38.500 --> 00:13:38.000 of the size of your organization, you're basically managing looking 313 00:13:38.500 --> 00:13:38.000 at their environment these days, you can think of it regardless 314 00:13:38.500 --> 00:13:40.000 of the size of your organization, you're basically managing looking 315 00:13:40.500 --> 00:13:44.000 after your compute resources, storage resources and networking resources. 316 00:13:44.500 --> 00:13:47.000 You're not just looking after a server or a workload or something 317 00:13:47.500 --> 00:13:49.000 like that. Just basically combination of the three that you have 318 00:13:49.500 --> 00:13:52.000 to juggle and balance to find the right environments. It's the 319 00:13:52.500 --> 00:13:55.000 same if you're a very large hosting company or if you're a very 320 00:13:55.500 --> 00:13:57.000 small mom and pop shop. 321 00:13:57.500 --> 00:13:59.000 >> Yeah. At the end of the day the transition that's happening 322 00:13:59.500 --> 00:14:04.000 now is from silos of responsibility to layers or tiers of responsibility. 323 00:14:04.500 --> 00:14:04.000 >> Right. 324 00:14:04.500 --> 00:14:05.000 >> You got it. 325 00:14:05.500 --> 00:14:07.000 >> And the tools and the thinking and the architecture that you 326 00:14:07.500 --> 00:14:12.000 build is no longer how do I build a server that someone administrators 327 00:14:12.500 --> 00:14:15.000 top to bottom and make that easy for them. But how do I build 328 00:14:15.500 --> 00:14:19.000 a layer that someone administrators side to side and they can 329 00:14:19.500 --> 00:14:23.000 scale out versus scaling up. There's a big push for scaling up. 330 00:14:23.500 --> 00:14:26.000 Now we're pushing for scaling out and doing it in layers. 331 00:14:26.500 --> 00:14:28.000 So I care about this layer, you care about this layer, and someone 332 00:14:28.500 --> 00:14:31.000 else cares about this layer. But it's a different way of thinking 333 00:14:31.500 --> 00:14:35.000 about how you approach network design. Data center design, service design. 334 00:14:35.500 --> 00:14:40.000 >> Yep. So from a background perspective, the concept of what 335 00:14:40.500 --> 00:14:44.000 we're calling the cloud OS basically is taking our knowledge 336 00:14:44.500 --> 00:14:49.000 that we have garnered and brought up from running multiple data 337 00:14:49.500 --> 00:14:51.000 centers, multiple very large properties and bringing those learnings 338 00:14:51.500 --> 00:14:54.000 from the large scale environments of the public data centers 339 00:14:54.500 --> 00:14:56.000 that we're running and bring that into our operating systems, 340 00:14:56.500 --> 00:14:59.000 so you'll see us extracting the disks. You'll see absence storm 341 00:14:59.500 --> 00:15:02.000 tracker continuing the network. You'll see us bringing in a layer 342 00:15:02.500 --> 00:15:06.000 of resiliency, and high availability to these different areas 343 00:15:06.500 --> 00:15:09.000 and being able to then go in, as you mentioned, talk about these 344 00:15:09.500 --> 00:15:12.000 layers that you go in and go off and manage. And the idea is 345 00:15:12.500 --> 00:15:16.000 that you're able to go off and transform your data center into 346 00:15:16.500 --> 00:15:17.000 a more 347 00:15:17.500 --> 00:15:20.000 manageable environment, a more automated environment, to be able 348 00:15:20.500 --> 00:15:23.000 to go off and get those different jobs or responsibilities done. 349 00:15:23.500 --> 00:15:26.000 So the good thing about this. If you already are working with 350 00:15:26.500 --> 00:15:29.000 and using Windows technologies you can take your skills you have 351 00:15:29.500 --> 00:15:32.000 and bring them into this new environment, and know that you'll 352 00:15:32.500 --> 00:15:34.000 be able to continue to work using the tools and things that you're 353 00:15:34.500 --> 00:15:35.000 used to working with. 354 00:15:35.500 --> 00:15:37.000 >> What does Azure run on? 355 00:15:37.500 --> 00:15:42.000 >> Azure actually runs on Server 2012 up in the cloud and and 356 00:15:42.500 --> 00:15:45.000 we're going to touch on it a little bit during the next entire 357 00:15:45.500 --> 00:15:45.000 two days. 358 00:15:45.500 --> 00:15:49.000 >> A lot of times people think that Azure runs on something different. 359 00:15:49.500 --> 00:15:49.000 >> Yeah. 360 00:15:49.500 --> 00:15:53.000 >> It doesn't. It runs on just plain old Windows server 2012. 361 00:15:53.500 --> 00:15:53.000 >> It's got a lot of custumization going on to make it work at 362 00:15:53.500 --> 00:15:53.000 >> It doesn't. It runs on just plain old Windows server 2012. 363 00:15:53.500 --> 00:15:55.000 >> It's got a lot of custumization going on to make it work at 364 00:15:55.500 --> 00:15:59.000 the different level. There's some really cool things we've made 365 00:15:59.500 --> 00:16:03.000 available with the release of 2012 R2. Because you can go in 366 00:16:03.500 --> 00:16:07.000 and run your own infrastructure as a service with your own private 367 00:16:07.500 --> 00:16:10.000 cloud and implementation with something we call the Windows Azure 368 00:16:10.500 --> 00:16:13.000 pack which allows you to basically have an Azure administrator 369 00:16:13.500 --> 00:16:17.000 portal to be able to go off and provision services, testimony plates. 370 00:16:17.500 --> 00:16:17.000 Applications. 371 00:16:17.500 --> 00:16:18.000 >> It's my Azure. 372 00:16:18.500 --> 00:16:19.000 >> Yeah. 373 00:16:19.500 --> 00:16:21.000 >> It's really, really neat stuff. 374 00:16:21.500 --> 00:16:26.000 Just going in here from an experience as I mentioned we're bringing 375 00:16:26.500 --> 00:16:28.000 in the content of what we've learned on a large content center, 376 00:16:28.500 --> 00:16:30.000 we're bringing it in on our our own environment from Windows 377 00:16:30.500 --> 00:16:34.000 Server, and making it available to you for where it happens to sit. 378 00:16:34.500 --> 00:16:37.000 Some things we brought in, basically, some high performance in 379 00:16:37.500 --> 00:16:41.000 the industry standard hardware, file based storage, storage spaces, 380 00:16:41.500 --> 00:16:45.000 automatic tearing, and some new stuff we'll be looking at this week. 381 00:16:45.500 --> 00:16:47.000 Multitenant environments in case you happen to deal with very 382 00:16:47.500 --> 00:16:49.000 large environments that have multiple customers that need to 383 00:16:49.500 --> 00:16:52.000 isolate from each other. The ability to go through and do some 384 00:16:52.500 --> 00:16:56.000 very cool stuff with software networking both at the virtualization 385 00:16:56.500 --> 00:16:59.000 layer and even at the physical layer as well to be able to control 386 00:16:59.500 --> 00:17:03.000 those things in an automated fashion. Policy based administration, delegation. 387 00:17:03.500 --> 00:17:07.000 It goes out and finally doing some very cool stuff on the website 388 00:17:07.500 --> 00:17:08.000 of thing. 389 00:17:08.500 --> 00:17:11.000 So from a challenges perspective, you know, we're all faced with 390 00:17:11.500 --> 00:17:15.000 the whole concept of shrinking I.T. budgets and trying to figure 391 00:17:15.500 --> 00:17:18.000 out how to add more from a business value to your organization 392 00:17:18.500 --> 00:17:22.000 and the idea is trying to run your data centers regardless of 393 00:17:22.500 --> 00:17:27.000 their size in a more optimized fashion in way to be able to go 394 00:17:27.500 --> 00:17:32.000 off and reduce your operational costs that are inside your environment. 395 00:17:32.500 --> 00:17:34.000 We have the ability to go through and mandate of trying to keep 396 00:17:34.500 --> 00:17:37.000 the lights on all of the time and make it so you have the ability 397 00:17:37.500 --> 00:17:40.000 to dynamically scale out and scale out to different resources 398 00:17:40.500 --> 00:17:44.000 of these different layers back up inside your system. 399 00:17:44.500 --> 00:17:47.000 I was talking with Jeffrey a little bit while ago at Tech Ed 400 00:17:47.500 --> 00:17:50.000 North America and he was talking about making like... to use 401 00:17:50.500 --> 00:17:54.000 an analogy of the plug and play environment, where you simply 402 00:17:54.500 --> 00:17:57.000 plug in your data or not. You plug in your compute or not into 403 00:17:57.500 --> 00:17:59.000 that type of cloud environment to be able to work with it. 404 00:17:59.500 --> 00:18:01.000 Like literally it's like three clouds these days. 405 00:18:01.500 --> 00:18:06.000 >> I mean this whole notion that you can define a service model. 406 00:18:06.500 --> 00:18:08.000 You can define a cun Fission ration which is something we'll 407 00:18:08.500 --> 00:18:11.000 talk about tomorrow in something called configuration management 408 00:18:11.500 --> 00:18:15.000 and just kind of say this is what I want and it's the same whether 409 00:18:15.500 --> 00:18:19.000 it's private, whether it's for service provider or whether it's public. 410 00:18:19.500 --> 00:18:20.000 >> Yep. 411 00:18:20.500 --> 00:18:22.000 >> And you just say this is what I want, and any one of the three 412 00:18:22.500 --> 00:18:25.000 and that's kind of the end goal for all of this, that things 413 00:18:25.500 --> 00:18:28.000 can move from any one of those environments to the other without 414 00:18:28.500 --> 00:18:32.000 any need for change, because at the end of the day change is 415 00:18:32.500 --> 00:18:34.000 what we're dealing with. That's when downtime happens. 416 00:18:34.500 --> 00:18:36.000 That's when things go wrong. You try to change something. 417 00:18:36.500 --> 00:18:37.000 >> Yeah. 418 00:18:37.500 --> 00:18:37.000 >> In fact, I'm pretty sure that's what happened this morning. 419 00:18:37.500 --> 00:18:37.000 >> Yeah. 420 00:18:37.500 --> 00:18:41.000 >> In fact, I'm pretty sure that's what happened this morning. 421 00:18:41.500 --> 00:18:44.000 We changed the stream. We added people to it. 422 00:18:44.500 --> 00:18:46.000 >> I guess that could be it, too. 423 00:18:46.500 --> 00:18:48.000 >> Your fault. Don't blame us, your fault. 424 00:18:48.500 --> 00:18:51.000 >> Take a look at this slide here to look at Windows Server 2012 425 00:18:51.500 --> 00:18:53.000 R2 from an overall perspective. 426 00:18:53.500 --> 00:18:56.000 This is basically laying this out for the rest of the next day 427 00:18:56.500 --> 00:19:00.000 and a half to two days. We're going to be talking about virtualization 428 00:19:00.500 --> 00:19:02.000 with different levels of performance. Again, think about it 429 00:19:02.500 --> 00:19:05.000 as your compute nodes being able to go off and being more efficiently 430 00:19:05.500 --> 00:19:08.000 be able to use your resources. We'll be talking about storage 431 00:19:08.500 --> 00:19:11.000 as you mentioned. We're going to save until the end of the day 432 00:19:11.500 --> 00:19:15.000 with some high performance capabilities at storage level without 433 00:19:15.500 --> 00:19:15.000 having to have the high performance pricing associated with it 434 00:19:15.500 --> 00:19:15.000 with some high performance capabilities at storage level without 435 00:19:15.500 --> 00:19:18.000 having to have the high performance pricing associated with it 436 00:19:18.500 --> 00:19:21.000 as well. It's built in box. Networking is very wrap-up as well 437 00:19:21.500 --> 00:19:24.000 for the rest of today for the topics we're covering. 438 00:19:24.500 --> 00:19:27.000 Tomorrow we're going to be looking at server automation and management. 439 00:19:27.500 --> 00:19:32.000 Access and information protection, and virtual desktop infrastructure 440 00:19:32.500 --> 00:19:32.000 with a little bit of web and application platform as well. 441 00:19:32.500 --> 00:19:32.000 Access and information protection, and virtual desktop infrastructure 442 00:19:32.500 --> 00:19:35.000 with a little bit of web and application platform as well. 443 00:19:35.500 --> 00:19:36.000 >> Sounds awesome. 444 00:19:36.500 --> 00:19:38.000 >> Can I get in a lot of trouble right now. 445 00:19:38.500 --> 00:19:40.000 >> You always get in a lot of trouble. 446 00:19:40.500 --> 00:19:44.000 >> Look at me very closely for a second. Sands are dead. 447 00:19:44.500 --> 00:19:45.000 More on that later. 448 00:19:45.500 --> 00:19:48.000 >> Nice. Details at 11:00. 449 00:19:48.500 --> 00:19:53.000 Nice. Server Vivarinization is the first main area we're going 450 00:19:53.500 --> 00:19:57.000 to be covering. New levels of performance and cross-platform support. 451 00:19:57.500 --> 00:20:01.000 But basically the idea of having... is it critical, is it Enterprise 452 00:20:01.500 --> 00:20:05.000 class, and Enterprise scale available and absolutely with 2012 453 00:20:05.500 --> 00:20:08.000 we already blew out the doors as far as our limits and capacities 454 00:20:08.500 --> 00:20:12.000 are concerned from a non-virtualizable work doesn't exist anymore. 455 00:20:12.500 --> 00:20:14.000 But the virtualization platform these days. 456 00:20:14.500 --> 00:20:17.000 >> I don't really like this whole question of is it Enterprise grade? 457 00:20:17.500 --> 00:20:21.000 I think what hyper-V does now defines Enterprise grade. 458 00:20:21.500 --> 00:20:23.000 >> Good point. So I think you may be look at everything else, 459 00:20:23.500 --> 00:20:25.000 and thinking is it Enterprise grade? I'm biased. 460 00:20:25.500 --> 00:20:29.000 >> And we also tie in a lot of the hardware architecture for being 461 00:20:29.500 --> 00:20:33.000 able to do a lot of the offloading with RDMA's as an example, 462 00:20:33.500 --> 00:20:35.000 and to be able to go off and get a lot of throughput transfer 463 00:20:35.500 --> 00:20:37.000 between different systems so definitely we're going to be doing 464 00:20:37.500 --> 00:20:42.000 a big section here on Enterprise class scale. Not a lot of changes 465 00:20:42.500 --> 00:20:44.000 from scale capabilities from 2012. 466 00:20:44.500 --> 00:20:44.000 >> No. 467 00:20:44.500 --> 00:20:48.000 >> 2012 R2. It's more how it rumblings different parts. 468 00:20:48.500 --> 00:20:52.000 >> The scale is not, oh, I can build a bigger server, I can build 469 00:20:52.500 --> 00:20:55.000 a bigger VM, I can build more memory. The scale improvements 470 00:20:55.500 --> 00:20:59.000 are now I can take it and make it run faster by taking advantage 471 00:20:59.500 --> 00:21:03.000 of assorted offloading capabilities and doing some things that 472 00:21:03.500 --> 00:21:08.000 are a little more intelligent inside of the VM's, inside the hosts. 473 00:21:08.500 --> 00:21:11.000 Like for example, virtual V side scaling, which is a new thing. 474 00:21:11.500 --> 00:21:11.000 >> Right. 475 00:21:11.500 --> 00:21:13.000 >> That we'll get into later on. 476 00:21:13.500 --> 00:21:16.000 >> Virtual machine mobility. We were leading the way with being 477 00:21:16.500 --> 00:21:16.000 able to do a shared nothing live migration. You literally would 478 00:21:16.500 --> 00:21:16.000 >> Virtual machine mobility. We were leading the way with being 479 00:21:16.500 --> 00:21:19.000 able to do a shared nothing live migration. You literally would 480 00:21:19.500 --> 00:21:23.000 have Annie third net cable sitting between two systems that were 481 00:21:23.500 --> 00:21:23.000 not connected to shared storage. Not connected to a sand environment, 482 00:21:23.500 --> 00:21:23.000 have Annie third net cable sitting between two systems that were 483 00:21:23.500 --> 00:21:26.000 not connected to shared storage. Not connected to a sand environment, 484 00:21:26.500 --> 00:21:29.000 direct attached storage if you wanted to and are able to move 485 00:21:29.500 --> 00:21:31.000 the workload between them. 486 00:21:31.500 --> 00:21:34.000 >> There's a very big important thing to kind of talk to and point 487 00:21:34.500 --> 00:21:39.000 out about that. Jump to my screen guys. So first of all, a lot 488 00:21:39.500 --> 00:21:42.000 of people may not have seen shared nothing migration, if you 489 00:21:42.500 --> 00:21:45.000 haven't, basically what I have here is I have a VM running on 490 00:21:45.500 --> 00:21:49.000 a host. It's not in a cluster. There's nothing shared. It's just 491 00:21:49.500 --> 00:21:49.000 local running... 492 00:21:49.500 --> 00:21:50.000 >> Local storage. 493 00:21:50.500 --> 00:21:53.000 >> Local running disc disk. Here it is. 494 00:21:53.500 --> 00:21:59.000 A local running disk. I can take that and move it to another 495 00:21:59.500 --> 00:22:04.000 host so I can go it, and let's take it and move it. So we'll 496 00:22:04.500 --> 00:22:07.000 go move, 497 00:22:07.500 --> 00:22:10.000 move the virtual machine. Now the storage live migration is a 498 00:22:10.500 --> 00:22:13.000 something else a little bit different. The notion that you have 499 00:22:13.500 --> 00:22:17.000 ultimate virtual machine flexibility in here. You can move the VM. 500 00:22:17.500 --> 00:22:20.000 You can move the disks. You can reposition. You can do anything 501 00:22:20.500 --> 00:22:23.000 you want without any downtime. It doesn't matter. You don't 502 00:22:23.500 --> 00:22:23.000 need to go offline to do this. So move virtual machine, new host. 503 00:22:23.500 --> 00:22:23.000 you want without any downtime. It doesn't matter. You don't 504 00:22:23.500 --> 00:22:27.000 need to go offline to do this. So move virtual machine, new host. 505 00:22:27.500 --> 00:22:31.000 I want to move to it we'll pick another server. I've got host 3. 506 00:22:31.500 --> 00:22:32.000 Hit next a couple of times. 507 00:22:32.500 --> 00:22:35.000 Move the data to a single location. We can be selective saying 508 00:22:35.500 --> 00:22:37.000 that the snapshots around this volume. The VHD's are around 509 00:22:37.500 --> 00:22:41.000 this volume. The storage is on this volume. 510 00:22:41.500 --> 00:22:45.000 That actually comes into play when you start getting into things 511 00:22:45.500 --> 00:22:49.000 like storage tearing because you can choose different and with 512 00:22:49.500 --> 00:22:52.000 storage tearing the right bank caching, and you can choose which 513 00:22:52.500 --> 00:22:55.000 volumes are best suited for the type of data. In VDI scenarios 514 00:22:55.500 --> 00:22:58.000 which we're going to talk about tomorrow where you position for 515 00:22:58.500 --> 00:22:58.000 example in a pooled VDI scenario with the base VHD, the gold 516 00:22:58.500 --> 00:22:58.000 which we're going to talk about tomorrow where you position for 517 00:22:58.500 --> 00:23:01.000 example in a pooled VDI scenario with the base VHD, the gold 518 00:23:01.500 --> 00:23:06.000 VHD versus the disk that it created, you can reposition those 519 00:23:06.500 --> 00:23:08.000 things after the fact if all of a sudden you need bigger faster 520 00:23:08.500 --> 00:23:10.000 better storage, for example. 521 00:23:10.500 --> 00:23:11.000 >> Right. 522 00:23:11.500 --> 00:23:11.000 >> Destination folder, 523 00:23:11.500 --> 00:23:11.000 >> Right. 524 00:23:11.500 --> 00:23:14.000 >> Destination folder, 525 00:23:14.500 --> 00:23:14.000 pick a folder. 526 00:23:14.500 --> 00:23:16.000 >> He's using local storage again. 527 00:23:16.500 --> 00:23:16.000 >> Local storage. 528 00:23:16.500 --> 00:23:18.000 >> Shared amongst these two guys. 529 00:23:18.500 --> 00:23:21.000 >> It's local destination to local destination. And that will 530 00:23:21.500 --> 00:23:21.000 all kind of Chuck off send it across the wire. And if I look 531 00:23:21.500 --> 00:23:21.000 >> It's local destination to local destination. And that will 532 00:23:21.500 --> 00:23:24.000 all kind of Chuck off send it across the wire. And if I look 533 00:23:24.500 --> 00:23:28.000 at host 3 you'll see it will spike in the network here once the 534 00:23:28.500 --> 00:23:31.000 migration actually starts. So there it is right there. 535 00:23:31.500 --> 00:23:34.000 >> Yep. For those that watched the last one of these we did I 536 00:23:34.500 --> 00:23:36.000 had really cool hardware last time. I don't have really cool 537 00:23:36.500 --> 00:23:36.000 hardware this time. 538 00:23:36.500 --> 00:23:36.000 had really cool hardware last time. I don't have really cool 539 00:23:36.500 --> 00:23:39.000 >> What are you talking about? This thing is very cool hardware there. 540 00:23:39.500 --> 00:23:41.000 We're not using it right now. The other cool stuff. 541 00:23:41.500 --> 00:23:45.000 >> The other cool stuff. But like my... I mean I had like 56 542 00:23:45.500 --> 00:23:47.000 signal last time, and I don't have that. All the cool stuff 543 00:23:47.500 --> 00:23:50.000 is on the truck back in Tech Ed Europe. 544 00:23:50.500 --> 00:23:54.000 We're... we had to repurpose stuff to be able to make this happen. 545 00:23:54.500 --> 00:23:59.000 >> So that's moving. Now, here the really important thing about this. 546 00:23:59.500 --> 00:24:02.000 You can now live migrate shared nothing migrate or cluster live 547 00:24:02.500 --> 00:24:08.000 migrate cross version. So I can go from 2012 to 2012 R2. 548 00:24:08.500 --> 00:24:11.000 >> So you can go with a production 2012 hyper-V environment that 549 00:24:11.500 --> 00:24:12.000 you implement today. 550 00:24:12.500 --> 00:24:13.000 >> Right. 551 00:24:13.500 --> 00:24:16.000 >> And then you can play around with the preproduction prerelease 552 00:24:16.500 --> 00:24:19.000 version of R2. Get comfortable with it. You can try doing some 553 00:24:19.500 --> 00:24:22.000 moves back and forth. When you're ready to go in the production 554 00:24:22.500 --> 00:24:26.000 version you don't have to do an export and import. You don't 555 00:24:26.500 --> 00:24:27.000 to do anything like that. 556 00:24:27.500 --> 00:24:27.000 >> No. 557 00:24:27.500 --> 00:24:28.000 >> It's a live migration. 558 00:24:28.500 --> 00:24:30.000 >> Essentially it's a no downtime migration for VM's. 559 00:24:30.500 --> 00:24:31.000 >> Nice. 560 00:24:31.500 --> 00:24:37.000 >> So if you want to go from 2012, to 2012 R2, you can't do VM 561 00:24:37.500 --> 00:24:40.000 upgrade with VM's running, but you can will allotted a shared 562 00:24:40.500 --> 00:24:47.000 nothing live upgrade up to a server R2 while the VM is running. 563 00:24:47.500 --> 00:24:50.000 Upgrade the 2012 server, and then a live migrate and back or 564 00:24:50.500 --> 00:24:53.000 choose not to. Point being the saved states are compatible. 565 00:24:53.500 --> 00:24:57.000 >> Nice. I can go from a 2012 cluster to a shared nothing live 566 00:24:57.500 --> 00:25:02.000 migration to a 2012 R2 cluster. You can't go down. 567 00:25:02.500 --> 00:25:03.000 >> It's a one way. 568 00:25:03.500 --> 00:25:06.000 >> It's a one way up. You can go up. The point being if you have 569 00:25:06.500 --> 00:25:10.000 a cloud fabric, you know one of the big issues that a lot of 570 00:25:10.500 --> 00:25:14.000 people had with this stuff was hey, if it's a new version I don't 571 00:25:14.500 --> 00:25:18.000 want to take data center wide downtime 572 00:25:18.500 --> 00:25:21.000 for all these in place. I don't want to take customer VM's offline 573 00:25:21.500 --> 00:25:25.000 because if you're a multitenant it's a nightmare to try to schedule this. 574 00:25:25.500 --> 00:25:27.000 >> Right. You don't have to now. All you've got to do is stand 575 00:25:27.500 --> 00:25:34.000 up your 2012 R2 environment, live migrate to it and upgrade or discard. 576 00:25:34.500 --> 00:25:35.000 >> Nice. 577 00:25:35.500 --> 00:25:37.000 >> So that's a big deal. 578 00:25:37.500 --> 00:25:40.000 >> We do have to clarify that that feature... that functionality 579 00:25:40.500 --> 00:25:43.000 is not available if you're running 2008 R2. 580 00:25:43.500 --> 00:25:43.000 >> Right. 581 00:25:43.500 --> 00:25:44.000 >> The previous version. 582 00:25:44.500 --> 00:25:45.000 >> It's 2012. 583 00:25:45.500 --> 00:25:48.000 >> 2012 to 2012 R2. Let's be very clear. I know we're going to 584 00:25:48.500 --> 00:25:49.000 get questions about that. 585 00:25:49.500 --> 00:25:53.000 >> We said that in sync... we need to shake pinkies now. 586 00:25:53.500 --> 00:25:57.000 >> Back on my slides here to wrap this guy up from the virtualization perspective. 587 00:25:57.500 --> 00:25:59.000 You kind of jumped into the demo that's the next section there. 588 00:25:59.500 --> 00:26:03.000 Don't forget we also have first class citizens support for Linux 589 00:26:03.500 --> 00:26:07.000 and Linux environments. We cover about 86% of the popular distributions 590 00:26:07.500 --> 00:26:07.000 with the enhancements or enlightenments of hyper-V 591 00:26:07.500 --> 00:26:07.000 and Linux environments. We cover about 86% of the popular distributions 592 00:26:07.500 --> 00:26:12.000 with the enhancements or enlightenments of hyper-V 593 00:26:12.500 --> 00:26:14.000 bits you need to have to have the full functionality has been 594 00:26:14.500 --> 00:26:19.000 involved with Lynn ix kernel since 26.1, and anything that supports 595 00:26:19.500 --> 00:26:22.000 that has them built in and obviously we support a wider range 596 00:26:22.500 --> 00:26:26.000 of up up to 86% of them. So they're in too and we might be able 597 00:26:26.500 --> 00:26:29.000 to show some of that. We might not. We don't have a VM ready 598 00:26:29.500 --> 00:26:30.000 to go for that. 599 00:26:30.500 --> 00:26:30.000 >> No, I don't. I tried. 600 00:26:30.500 --> 00:26:30.000 to go for that. 601 00:26:30.500 --> 00:26:32.000 >> No, I don't. I tried. 602 00:26:32.500 --> 00:26:34.000 >> But it is supported. It's all there. 603 00:26:34.500 --> 00:26:34.000 >> And there's what's cool and new 604 00:26:34.500 --> 00:26:34.000 >> But it is supported. It's all there. 605 00:26:34.500 --> 00:26:38.000 >> And there's what's cool and new 606 00:26:38.500 --> 00:26:39.000 dynamic memory for Linux. 607 00:26:39.500 --> 00:26:42.000 >> We'll save that for the virtualization module. This is still 608 00:26:42.500 --> 00:26:44.000 the introduction. We'll get there. Don't give everything away. 609 00:26:44.500 --> 00:26:48.000 >> Don't slow me down. I'm excited. 610 00:26:48.500 --> 00:26:49.000 Come on, Rick. 611 00:26:49.500 --> 00:26:53.000 >> Back here at the slides. The high performance live migration 612 00:26:53.500 --> 00:26:57.000 as you mentioned between the network adaptors we do hardware 613 00:26:57.500 --> 00:27:02.000 off-load to... we do C.P.U. off-load to the different cards for 614 00:27:02.500 --> 00:27:06.000 being able to live migration with RDMA. We do also migration 615 00:27:06.500 --> 00:27:10.000 between the two systems in a faster fashion. We'll talk about 616 00:27:10.500 --> 00:27:13.000 this later in the virtualization section with the option of going 617 00:27:13.500 --> 00:27:16.000 through compression. Because if you have available C.P.U. 618 00:27:16.500 --> 00:27:18.000 cycles why not depress the stuff and move it across, and bring 619 00:27:18.500 --> 00:27:21.000 it back up again, and decompress on the other side to be able 620 00:27:21.500 --> 00:27:21.000 to speed things up. 621 00:27:21.500 --> 00:27:24.000 >> Yeah. And here's another fundamental shift that you guys that 622 00:27:24.500 --> 00:27:28.000 are architecting new data center fabrics and keep in mind. 623 00:27:28.500 --> 00:27:29.000 The C basmati's has never been the bottleneck. 624 00:27:29.500 --> 00:27:30.000 >> Right. 625 00:27:30.500 --> 00:27:33.000 >> The C.P.U. is becoming the bottleneck. As you get into 10 626 00:27:33.500 --> 00:27:37.000 gig, and higher and team 10 gig. 627 00:27:37.500 --> 00:27:38.000 >> And multiple sessions. 628 00:27:38.500 --> 00:27:39.000 >> And multiple sessions. 629 00:27:39.500 --> 00:27:40.000 >> And MSMB 3. 630 00:27:40.500 --> 00:27:44.000 >> And the C.P.U. can become the bottleneck. That's why offloading 631 00:27:44.500 --> 00:27:47.000 becomes so important, and so when you're looking at purchasing 632 00:27:47.500 --> 00:27:51.000 hardware offloading which was sort of an afterthought in the 633 00:27:51.500 --> 00:27:54.000 past has to come to the forefront of your mind now. When you're 634 00:27:54.500 --> 00:27:59.000 looking at card, do they support SMB direct RDMA. Do they support 635 00:27:59.500 --> 00:28:03.000 offloading for VMQ, SRUV, and you've got to take those hardware 636 00:28:03.500 --> 00:28:07.000 things into consideration. Because the C.P.U.'s is becoming the bottleneck. 637 00:28:07.500 --> 00:28:10.000 In fact, there was a demo that the guys that technical... 638 00:28:10.500 --> 00:28:13.000 we'll talk with tech a little bit. There's some phenomenal resources 639 00:28:13.500 --> 00:28:17.000 there, and you know how we kind of incorporate some of that in here. 640 00:28:17.500 --> 00:28:22.000 But they actually were doing live migrations so quick that the 641 00:28:22.500 --> 00:28:24.000 bottleneck became memory. 642 00:28:24.500 --> 00:28:27.000 >> Yeah. I remember they were talking about the whole concept 643 00:28:27.500 --> 00:28:29.000 of the automated testing that goes on. 644 00:28:29.500 --> 00:28:29.000 >> Yeah. 645 00:28:29.500 --> 00:28:32.000 >> They implemented RDMA as an option for being able to do transfer 646 00:28:32.500 --> 00:28:35.000 between two hosts. It was happening so quick, 647 00:28:35.500 --> 00:28:39.000 one of the texts is actually cancel out my Griggs in process 648 00:28:39.500 --> 00:28:42.000 of the my Griggs to make sure that it's able to recover and still work. 649 00:28:42.500 --> 00:28:44.000 They couldn't cancel it fast enough with the automated tests 650 00:28:44.500 --> 00:28:47.000 they came in the next day and all these tests had failed. 651 00:28:47.500 --> 00:28:47.000 It's because they couldn't cancel out migration because it had 652 00:28:47.500 --> 00:28:47.000 they came in the next day and all these tests had failed. 653 00:28:47.500 --> 00:28:48.000 It's because they couldn't cancel out migration because it had 654 00:28:48.500 --> 00:28:49.000 completed too quickly. 655 00:28:49.500 --> 00:28:50.000 >> Yeah. 656 00:28:50.500 --> 00:28:52.000 >> So very, very cool stuff. 657 00:28:52.500 --> 00:28:55.000 From a lied perspective, just this actually covers through an 658 00:28:55.500 --> 00:28:58.000 animation how this particular workload migration works for share. 659 00:28:58.500 --> 00:29:00.000 Live migration 660 00:29:00.500 --> 00:29:03.000 requests that goes on. You've got an IP connection. It sends 661 00:29:03.500 --> 00:29:03.000 it over the configuration data. The machine is still running 662 00:29:03.500 --> 00:29:03.000 requests that goes on. You've got an IP connection. It sends 663 00:29:03.500 --> 00:29:05.000 it over the configuration data. The machine is still running 664 00:29:05.500 --> 00:29:08.000 and talking to the source drive. Everything is all still good. 665 00:29:08.500 --> 00:29:14.000 It then has ability to go through and send rights and data over 666 00:29:14.500 --> 00:29:18.000 to destination device. It then all new rights basically goes 667 00:29:18.500 --> 00:29:21.000 to both devices while it's still going on. It then while that's 668 00:29:21.500 --> 00:29:24.000 going on goes to the other side as well. It then goes through 669 00:29:24.500 --> 00:29:27.000 and does it modified memory page. After that fact to make sure 670 00:29:27.500 --> 00:29:32.000 everything is in sync and it makes the cut over within the TCP 671 00:29:32.500 --> 00:29:33.000 window as if nothing happened. 672 00:29:33.500 --> 00:29:37.000 >> 25 seconds within the TCP window to make it under. 673 00:29:37.500 --> 00:29:40.000 Now, a question that's come up, 45 times. 674 00:29:40.500 --> 00:29:41.000 >> Already. 675 00:29:41.500 --> 00:29:46.000 >> Since we started, I didn't get 43 maybe, can you allow my great 676 00:29:46.500 --> 00:29:46.000 into RDMA. No, you can't. It's got to be family to family, it's 677 00:29:46.500 --> 00:29:46.000 >> Since we started, I didn't get 43 maybe, can you allow my great 678 00:29:46.500 --> 00:29:49.000 into RDMA. No, you can't. It's got to be family to family, it's 679 00:29:49.500 --> 00:29:55.000 got to be AMD to AMD, Intel to Intel, and there's a flag within 680 00:29:55.500 --> 00:29:55.000 the VM and jump down to the screen real quick, if I go to the 681 00:29:55.500 --> 00:29:55.000 got to be AMD to AMD, Intel to Intel, and there's a flag within 682 00:29:55.500 --> 00:29:58.000 the VM and jump down to the screen real quick, if I go to the 683 00:29:58.500 --> 00:30:03.000 settings of a VM, go to the processer under compatibility there's 684 00:30:03.500 --> 00:30:06.000 this VM is running so I can't check it. You can do this on a 685 00:30:06.500 --> 00:30:08.000 VM that's powered off. 686 00:30:08.500 --> 00:30:11.000 So my personal best practice is every VM I create is set this 687 00:30:11.500 --> 00:30:13.000 just with the box. 688 00:30:13.500 --> 00:30:16.000 Which is migrate to a different processor version. What this 689 00:30:16.500 --> 00:30:20.000 does is on a C.P.U. the C.P.U. typically exposes certain feature sets... 690 00:30:20.500 --> 00:30:25.000 I don't remember, MMX and SSX, and all these different you know 691 00:30:25.500 --> 00:30:25.000 audio video optimizations that mix model... typically consumer 692 00:30:25.500 --> 00:30:25.000 I don't remember, MMX and SSX, and all these different you know 693 00:30:25.500 --> 00:30:29.000 audio video optimizations that mix model... typically consumer 694 00:30:29.500 --> 00:30:30.000 created C.P.U.s. 695 00:30:30.500 --> 00:30:35.000 >> Yeah. And it limits those to create a baseline of Compatn't 696 00:30:35.500 --> 00:30:39.000 so you can bounce from a one generation to another generation 697 00:30:39.500 --> 00:30:41.000 of a processor but it's Intel to Intel and AMD to AMD. 698 00:30:41.500 --> 00:30:43.000 >> It's still the same family. 699 00:30:43.500 --> 00:30:43.000 >> Because their architecture is still too fundamentally different. 700 00:30:43.500 --> 00:30:43.000 >> It's still the same family. 701 00:30:43.500 --> 00:30:45.000 >> Because their architecture is still too fundamentally different. 702 00:30:45.500 --> 00:30:49.000 >> Yeah. The last little piece we have about virtualization is 703 00:30:49.500 --> 00:30:53.000 talking about dynamic memory, and where dynamic memory fits. 704 00:30:53.500 --> 00:30:54.000 >> I ruined that. 705 00:30:54.500 --> 00:30:57.000 >> I know. It's like the idea basically is that dynamic memory 706 00:30:57.500 --> 00:31:01.000 has not changed from 2012 to 2012 R2. The deaths that's new 707 00:31:01.500 --> 00:31:05.000 is the fact that new Linux has the ability to take advantage 708 00:31:05.500 --> 00:31:08.000 of dynamic memory. The idea is basically set a minimum memory 709 00:31:08.500 --> 00:31:10.000 and a maximum memory on your machine and will you turn on the 710 00:31:10.500 --> 00:31:13.000 dynamic memory as well and then the server hosts the machine 711 00:31:13.500 --> 00:31:16.000 decides what's available and shown to the actual operating system 712 00:31:16.500 --> 00:31:20.000 to be able to use it and then potentially is able to go and use 713 00:31:20.500 --> 00:31:22.000 more, and then take it away as it needs to without the guest 714 00:31:22.500 --> 00:31:25.000 OS without caring or knowing it's going on. It's always a step 715 00:31:25.500 --> 00:31:28.000 ahead of game from where it is. 716 00:31:28.500 --> 00:31:30.000 And then also some benefits for it. We have this other thing 717 00:31:30.500 --> 00:31:33.000 going on which happens to be called smart paging where basically 718 00:31:33.500 --> 00:31:33.000 you set a start up amount of RAM for a system. If the memory 719 00:31:33.500 --> 00:31:33.000 going on which happens to be called smart paging where basically 720 00:31:33.500 --> 00:31:36.000 you set a start up amount of RAM for a system. If the memory 721 00:31:36.500 --> 00:31:40.000 resources you can see there VMM on the far end side is not currently 722 00:31:40.500 --> 00:31:43.000 turned on. There's not enough memory available on the system 723 00:31:43.500 --> 00:31:46.000 to be able to start it. You're able to go through and use smart 724 00:31:46.500 --> 00:31:49.000 paging where basically it is able to go in and temporarily increase 725 00:31:49.500 --> 00:31:52.000 the amount of memory available to that one machine so it hits 726 00:31:52.500 --> 00:31:55.000 it's the start up environment but it uses the page file as it's 727 00:31:55.500 --> 00:31:59.000 starting up, and then as it is finished initializing it then 728 00:31:59.500 --> 00:32:03.000 goes in and rebalances stuff to get rid of those re-paging files 729 00:32:03.500 --> 00:32:08.000 memory references to not impact performance amongst the different machines. 730 00:32:08.500 --> 00:32:11.000 >> Yeah, so take a look down for a second over here. Again, settings 731 00:32:11.500 --> 00:32:16.000 of a VM under memory. You can change the minimum, maximum RAM 732 00:32:16.500 --> 00:32:19.000 values while the machine is running and the buffer value you 733 00:32:19.500 --> 00:32:21.000 can change the start up while it's running. So these are going 734 00:32:21.500 --> 00:32:24.000 to change initially, but this is where you would actually configure 735 00:32:24.500 --> 00:32:29.000 that and see so your minimum is the least it could ever have. 736 00:32:29.500 --> 00:32:32.000 Maximum is the max what it would go. Startup is what it's going 737 00:32:32.500 --> 00:32:36.000 to go when it's booting. One little example of where this comes 738 00:32:36.500 --> 00:32:42.000 into practical use, is if you're doing OS deployment to VMs when 739 00:32:42.500 --> 00:32:47.000 P requires a gig, but Windows requires less than a gig. And so 740 00:32:47.500 --> 00:32:50.000 if you build a VM for Windows, and you put like 512 in them. 741 00:32:50.500 --> 00:32:55.000 I typically start when I build VMs and then you try to drop Windows 742 00:32:55.500 --> 00:32:55.000 P into it, Windows P says I don't have enough memory. So it's 743 00:32:55.500 --> 00:32:55.000 I typically start when I build VMs and then you try to drop Windows 744 00:32:55.500 --> 00:32:58.000 P into it, Windows P says I don't have enough memory. So it's 745 00:32:58.500 --> 00:33:00.000 a way to get around it is to do the initial startup. 746 00:33:00.500 --> 00:33:03.000 >> Literally it changes the way you do your machine design when 747 00:33:03.500 --> 00:33:06.000 you're doing stuff. Literally you say here's the defaults and 748 00:33:06.500 --> 00:33:09.000 I've got dynamic memory turned on and then I'm done. I let the 749 00:33:09.500 --> 00:33:12.000 host decide how much RAM the guy gets to use. 750 00:33:12.500 --> 00:33:15.000 >> There's some pretty common and feel free to tell me... 751 00:33:15.500 --> 00:33:16.000 save this for later. 752 00:33:16.500 --> 00:33:19.000 >> Save it for later. There you go. How is that? Because we're 753 00:33:19.500 --> 00:33:22.000 moving into networking next. We have a whole section on virtualization, man. 754 00:33:22.500 --> 00:33:25.000 We're giving... we both love virtualization. We've got to save 755 00:33:25.500 --> 00:33:26.000 it for the next section. 756 00:33:26.500 --> 00:33:27.000 >> Yes. 757 00:33:27.500 --> 00:33:29.000 >> This was the teaser. This was the teaser. The next section 758 00:33:29.500 --> 00:33:30.000 we're talking about is networking. 759 00:33:30.500 --> 00:33:32.000 >> I've been beaten with a stick. 760 00:33:32.500 --> 00:33:35.000 >> The next section is networking. 761 00:33:35.500 --> 00:33:39.000 So from a networking perspective, the idea is that we've got... 762 00:33:39.500 --> 00:33:43.000 this was again available in 2012 but now 763 00:33:43.500 --> 00:33:47.000 is now available in 2012 R2, and the 2012 R2 piece is it actually 764 00:33:47.500 --> 00:33:50.000 bridges the gap between Vivarin Chula networking the software 765 00:33:50.500 --> 00:33:53.000 designed and even the physical switches as well-being able to 766 00:33:53.500 --> 00:33:55.000 able manage them all as well with that fabric management tool 767 00:33:55.500 --> 00:33:59.000 that we're going to talk about, which is the SVMM, which is the virtualization. 768 00:33:59.500 --> 00:34:02.000 >> Yeah. Software networking is not just network virtualization. 769 00:34:02.500 --> 00:34:04.000 It's things beyond that. It's some new things that are rolling in. 770 00:34:04.500 --> 00:34:09.000 For example, there are some relatively 771 00:34:09.500 --> 00:34:12.000 cryptic methods for administering switches for example. You can 772 00:34:12.500 --> 00:34:16.000 with Powershell turn off a switchboard on a physical switch if 773 00:34:16.500 --> 00:34:17.000 the switch supports the standards. 774 00:34:17.500 --> 00:34:18.000 >> Uh-huh. 775 00:34:18.500 --> 00:34:18.000 >> You know, and so there's all these vendors now beginning to 776 00:34:18.500 --> 00:34:18.000 >> Uh-huh. 777 00:34:18.500 --> 00:34:20.000 >> You know, and so there's all these vendors now beginning to 778 00:34:20.500 --> 00:34:23.000 support these new standards for hardware based management that 779 00:34:23.500 --> 00:34:23.000 Powershell rumblings through WMI and through SIMM so you get 780 00:34:23.500 --> 00:34:23.000 support these new standards for hardware based management that 781 00:34:23.500 --> 00:34:27.000 Powershell rumblings through WMI and through SIMM so you get 782 00:34:27.500 --> 00:34:31.000 a level of control now that you didn't have before, and that's 783 00:34:31.500 --> 00:34:34.000 what's often called data center abstraction layer. 784 00:34:34.500 --> 00:34:34.000 >> Yeah. 785 00:34:34.500 --> 00:34:38.000 >> Where I can use Powershell to configure a switch to IPMI, and 786 00:34:38.500 --> 00:34:41.000 we'll look at some of that stuff tomorrow. 787 00:34:41.500 --> 00:34:42.000 Stick around. 788 00:34:42.500 --> 00:34:47.000 >> You got it. From a networking perspective as well we have 789 00:34:47.500 --> 00:34:51.000 high performance networking with basically offloads to the different 790 00:34:51.500 --> 00:34:55.000 cards that are there with single root IO virtualization supported 791 00:34:55.500 --> 00:34:59.000 with live migration. The ability to do it with NIC teaming. 792 00:34:59.500 --> 00:35:01.000 Low balancing between the different NICS teaming. 793 00:35:01.500 --> 00:35:02.000 >> Teaming has gotten better. 794 00:35:02.500 --> 00:35:03.000 >> Yes, teaming has gotten better. 795 00:35:03.500 --> 00:35:09.000 >> Teaming in 2012 was phenomenal. It was like in my world it 796 00:35:09.500 --> 00:35:12.000 was an absolutely lifesaver because I could run one Powershell 797 00:35:12.500 --> 00:35:16.000 servers, and I could have redundancy on 70 servers. But the 798 00:35:16.500 --> 00:35:19.000 algorithms that were used within teaming isn't as efficient as 799 00:35:19.500 --> 00:35:22.000 they are now so they've changed the teaming algorithms as well. 800 00:35:22.500 --> 00:35:22.000 It's one of those things subtle but significant things that it's 801 00:35:22.500 --> 00:35:22.000 they are now so they've changed the teaming algorithms as well. 802 00:35:22.500 --> 00:35:24.000 It's one of those things subtle but significant things that it's 803 00:35:24.500 --> 00:35:28.000 very difficult to show you this. But I can show where you can configure. 804 00:35:28.500 --> 00:35:30.000 >> Uh-huh. 805 00:35:30.500 --> 00:35:32.000 >> And then finally with improved manage ability and diagnostics 806 00:35:32.500 --> 00:35:35.000 as you mention we now have hooks into the machines to be able 807 00:35:35.500 --> 00:35:38.000 to go off and do resource metering. To find out which different 808 00:35:38.500 --> 00:35:38.000 resources are being used and then also do look back and charge 809 00:35:38.500 --> 00:35:38.000 to go off and do resource metering. To find out which different 810 00:35:38.500 --> 00:35:40.000 resources are being used and then also do look back and charge 811 00:35:40.500 --> 00:35:44.000 back if you wanted to. We also have virtual IP management now 812 00:35:44.500 --> 00:35:47.000 capable with our IPAM solution. 813 00:35:47.500 --> 00:35:50.000 QWAS was already there. D.N.S. traffic was already there as well. 814 00:35:50.500 --> 00:35:51.000 >> Yep. 815 00:35:51.500 --> 00:35:54.000 >> So generally again some slight improvements and tweaks here 816 00:35:54.500 --> 00:35:56.000 and there between the 2012 and the R2 versions. 817 00:35:56.500 --> 00:35:59.000 >> Raise your hand if you've deployed IPAM. 818 00:35:59.500 --> 00:36:00.000 Good >> About 819 00:36:00.500 --> 00:36:01.000 half the room here. 820 00:36:01.500 --> 00:36:05.000 >> About half the people have deployed it, I can tell. You know, 821 00:36:05.500 --> 00:36:06.000 some guy sitting at home right now at his computer, and he's 822 00:36:06.500 --> 00:36:09.000 going like this and his wife is like why do you have your hand 823 00:36:09.500 --> 00:36:10.000 in the air? 824 00:36:10.500 --> 00:36:15.000 >> We can see you. You don't know this. We can see you. The software 825 00:36:15.500 --> 00:36:17.000 defined networking. That's the first section we talk about. 826 00:36:17.500 --> 00:36:21.000 It's very big 827 00:36:21.500 --> 00:36:23.000 discussion as far as software defined networking. We've been 828 00:36:23.500 --> 00:36:26.000 doing it for a while, since 2012. 829 00:36:26.500 --> 00:36:26.000 >> Yeah. 830 00:36:26.500 --> 00:36:29.000 >> So we're not new to this game. We've now enhanced it even 831 00:36:29.500 --> 00:36:32.000 more with what we're doing, and literally you have blue company 832 00:36:32.500 --> 00:36:35.000 and red company with the same internal IP addressing and you 833 00:36:35.500 --> 00:36:38.000 now need to on board or work with or do stuff with, and they 834 00:36:38.500 --> 00:36:43.000 are able to go off and have the ability to run on the same subnet 835 00:36:43.500 --> 00:36:48.000 as the host environment for virtualization, and then have the 836 00:36:48.500 --> 00:36:48.000 ability to coexist without realizing they're coexisting on the 837 00:36:48.500 --> 00:36:48.000 as the host environment for virtualization, and then have the 838 00:36:48.500 --> 00:36:51.000 ability to coexist without realizing they're coexisting on the 839 00:36:51.500 --> 00:36:52.000 same environment. 840 00:36:52.500 --> 00:36:53.000 >> Can I make a random, pointless comment? 841 00:36:53.500 --> 00:36:54.000 >> Sure. 842 00:36:54.500 --> 00:37:00.000 >> On the slide there's an acronym, BYOIP. And so you know, obviously 843 00:37:00.500 --> 00:37:03.000 we're all heard BYOIP, you go to a party and you have bring your 844 00:37:03.500 --> 00:37:06.000 own beer, right. That eventually gets picked up because most I.T. 845 00:37:06.500 --> 00:37:12.000 guys are quite frankly heavy drinkers we have to be to get through 846 00:37:12.500 --> 00:37:15.000 some stuff. So that again bring your own device. Now we have 847 00:37:15.500 --> 00:37:18.000 bring your own IP. I want to host a bring your own IP party. 848 00:37:18.500 --> 00:37:20.000 You can't come to my party unless you bring your own IP. 849 00:37:20.500 --> 00:37:23.000 >> I'll make sure I bring my own IP 6 address and GUI with me. 850 00:37:23.500 --> 00:37:25.000 >> You don't get in the door unless you have an IP address. 851 00:37:25.500 --> 00:37:27.000 >> What is your... 852 00:37:27.500 --> 00:37:28.000 >> Nobody is going to turn up. 853 00:37:28.500 --> 00:37:31.000 >> You got it. 127.100.1, my friend. 854 00:37:31.500 --> 00:37:32.000 >> Colon, colon 1. 855 00:37:32.500 --> 00:37:33.000 >> You got it. 856 00:37:33.500 --> 00:37:35.000 >> Get with the modern times. 857 00:37:35.500 --> 00:37:39.000 >> You got it. You mentioned NIC teaming. NIC was available in 2012. 858 00:37:39.500 --> 00:37:43.000 The main thing that we have is an enhancement to LBFO for load 859 00:37:43.500 --> 00:37:46.000 balancing between them. Instead of the main thing that the NIC 860 00:37:46.500 --> 00:37:49.000 teaming was done is we bring all of the drivers in-house. 861 00:37:49.500 --> 00:37:52.000 We don't have any proprietary drivers that are being used. 862 00:37:52.500 --> 00:37:54.000 The drivers are the manufacturers and then there's no teaming 863 00:37:54.500 --> 00:37:57.000 software from the manufacturer anymore. It's done in-house with 864 00:37:57.500 --> 00:38:00.000 the operating system. I've actually met the PM in charge of them. 865 00:38:00.500 --> 00:38:04.000 He's got a NIC team of 32 different vendors and it's fully supported. 866 00:38:04.500 --> 00:38:06.000 >> It's one of those because I can. 867 00:38:06.500 --> 00:38:08.000 >> Because you can kind of thing. 868 00:38:08.500 --> 00:38:10.000 But again, it's vendor gnostic and it give you the ability to 869 00:38:10.500 --> 00:38:13.000 have management through UI. Management through Powershell as 870 00:38:13.500 --> 00:38:15.000 you mentioned. The biggest thing it handles and looks after is 871 00:38:15.500 --> 00:38:18.000 when a particular NIC fails or a particular NIC becomes unplugged 872 00:38:18.500 --> 00:38:20.000 so it's a resiliency thing. 873 00:38:20.500 --> 00:38:23.000 >> Yeah. Which is that usually the cause of human error is someone 874 00:38:23.500 --> 00:38:26.000 unplugged something or else the machine breaks. It still continues 875 00:38:26.500 --> 00:38:26.000 to run. 876 00:38:26.500 --> 00:38:28.000 >> Or they're fishing in the back of the rack trying to bring 877 00:38:28.500 --> 00:38:29.000 the new server on-line. 878 00:38:29.500 --> 00:38:32.000 >> And they didn't realize they unplugged three different servers 879 00:38:32.500 --> 00:38:32.000 by mistake. 880 00:38:32.500 --> 00:38:32.000 >> And they didn't realize they unplugged three different servers 881 00:38:32.500 --> 00:38:37.000 >> Or bumped them. Or you had the network card but you had a half 882 00:38:37.500 --> 00:38:41.000 slot and you had to pull the clip off of it. Now it's just sitting 883 00:38:41.500 --> 00:38:43.000 in the VSC bus only. 884 00:38:43.500 --> 00:38:44.000 >> Oh, nice. 885 00:38:44.500 --> 00:38:46.000 You seem like you've done this before. 886 00:38:46.500 --> 00:38:47.000 >> No, I haven't. 887 00:38:47.500 --> 00:38:48.000 >> You had the troubleshoot it before. 888 00:38:48.500 --> 00:38:49.000 >> The guy who used to work for me did. 889 00:38:49.500 --> 00:38:50.000 >> Okay. 890 00:38:50.500 --> 00:38:55.000 Nice. So NIC teaming is able to go through and handle the failure 891 00:38:55.500 --> 00:39:00.000 and just keep on working as it should on the different systems. 892 00:39:00.500 --> 00:39:02.000 >> Now, we'll talk a little bit in-depth in the NIC teaming session 893 00:39:02.500 --> 00:39:04.000 and kind of do some background on NIC teaming because it's important 894 00:39:04.500 --> 00:39:08.000 to understand where this fits in and how it works. 895 00:39:08.500 --> 00:39:11.000 >> Virtual IP addressing same thing will be covered in this section 896 00:39:11.500 --> 00:39:12.000 as well. 897 00:39:12.500 --> 00:39:12.000 >> And NIC teaming can be passed into the VM's this is a host thing. 898 00:39:12.500 --> 00:39:12.000 as well. 899 00:39:12.500 --> 00:39:14.000 >> And NIC teaming can be passed into the VM's this is a host thing. 900 00:39:14.500 --> 00:39:19.000 You can shove the team right up into the VM's themselves, and 901 00:39:19.500 --> 00:39:21.000 there's reasons you would do one over the other. 902 00:39:21.500 --> 00:39:24.000 >> Now, IPAM is an in box feature. It was there with 2012. 903 00:39:24.500 --> 00:39:27.000 It's been improved upon with 2012 R2, and in one of the things 904 00:39:27.500 --> 00:39:30.000 it does is also it does the virtualized IP management as well, 905 00:39:30.500 --> 00:39:31.000 not just the physical stuff. 906 00:39:31.500 --> 00:39:36.000 >> Right. That's the big change for R2 is IPAM now can handle 907 00:39:36.500 --> 00:39:40.000 in the handbook can address virtual networks as opposed to physical networks. 908 00:39:40.500 --> 00:39:41.000 >> Yeah. 909 00:39:41.500 --> 00:39:46.000 >> And which obviously when you deal with hypervnet work virtualization 910 00:39:46.500 --> 00:39:47.000 that becomes an important thing. 911 00:39:47.500 --> 00:39:48.000 >> Yeah. 912 00:39:48.500 --> 00:39:50.000 >> And IPAM if you're not familiar with IPAM, fundamentally what 913 00:39:50.500 --> 00:39:54.000 it is it's a single Payne of glass for IP address services which 914 00:39:54.500 --> 00:39:57.000 include active directory, DMS and DHCP. 915 00:39:57.500 --> 00:39:59.000 >> It also does network policy servers. 916 00:39:59.500 --> 00:40:02.000 >> Policy servers and is also is able to import and export from 917 00:40:02.500 --> 00:40:04.000 third-party solutions if you want them to. 918 00:40:04.500 --> 00:40:04.000 >> Yeah. 919 00:40:04.500 --> 00:40:06.000 >> Because of the Powershell based and handles that. 920 00:40:06.500 --> 00:40:08.000 >> And it's basically backed by a database. 921 00:40:08.500 --> 00:40:09.000 >> Yeah. 922 00:40:09.500 --> 00:40:09.000 >> I call it... it's what I call the humanization, it's a bad word. 923 00:40:09.500 --> 00:40:09.000 >> Yeah. 924 00:40:09.500 --> 00:40:12.000 >> I call it... it's what I call the humanization, it's a bad word. 925 00:40:12.500 --> 00:40:16.000 It doesn't exist. It puts your human aspect how you manage your 926 00:40:16.500 --> 00:40:20.000 network into a knowledge environment that you then can say, oh, 927 00:40:20.500 --> 00:40:20.000 I need to deploy a new machine deployment in 2006. I don't need 928 00:40:20.500 --> 00:40:20.000 network into a knowledge environment that you then can say, oh, 929 00:40:20.500 --> 00:40:23.000 I need to deploy a new machine deployment in 2006. I don't need 930 00:40:23.500 --> 00:40:26.000 to know what IP range it is or what range I have to put my servers 931 00:40:26.500 --> 00:40:29.000 versus my desk tops versus my work stations in. It just knows 932 00:40:29.500 --> 00:40:30.000 building 2006 which to run. 933 00:40:30.500 --> 00:40:35.000 >> Which server blocks runs DHCP, and I've got some scopes over here. 934 00:40:35.500 --> 00:40:38.000 I've got a subnet, and I've got some are on this, and some are 935 00:40:38.500 --> 00:40:41.000 here, and some are here and how does it bring it together. 936 00:40:41.500 --> 00:40:42.000 It also now handles DHCP failover. 937 00:40:42.500 --> 00:40:45.000 >> Yeah. Which it didn't before so there's some big changes there. 938 00:40:45.500 --> 00:40:48.000 >> Now, we mentioned storage being a very big investment and a 939 00:40:48.500 --> 00:40:51.000 big change area as well. I'm going to build this slide out so 940 00:40:51.500 --> 00:40:53.000 you can see it at once here. 941 00:40:53.500 --> 00:40:56.000 High performance storage on industry standard hardware. 942 00:40:56.500 --> 00:40:59.000 Storage spaces is the main way to be able to do this. And then 943 00:40:59.500 --> 00:41:03.000 the ability to go through and talk to J-bod enclosures to have 944 00:41:03.500 --> 00:41:05.000 Enterprise class. 945 00:41:05.500 --> 00:41:06.000 >> SANS are dead. 946 00:41:06.500 --> 00:41:07.000 >> Stop. It's out there. 947 00:41:07.500 --> 00:41:11.000 >> Don't hate me. I'll explain and... 948 00:41:11.500 --> 00:41:15.000 no, I'm not 100% right SANS are gone a way. They didn't just vanish. 949 00:41:15.500 --> 00:41:19.000 But as we talk about this next-generation architecture, the definition 950 00:41:19.500 --> 00:41:22.000 of what an SAN is can change quite a bit, and you can save a 951 00:41:22.500 --> 00:41:22.000 ton of money. 952 00:41:22.500 --> 00:41:25.000 >> I anticipate that we'll be doing some white boarding during 953 00:41:25.500 --> 00:41:25.000 this session. 954 00:41:25.500 --> 00:41:29.000 >> We'll do a little bit. I anticipate that probably I'm going 955 00:41:29.500 --> 00:41:31.000 to have some haters on the little chat line when I say that. 956 00:41:31.500 --> 00:41:32.000 That's fine. 957 00:41:32.500 --> 00:41:35.000 Rick is my friend. I'm good. 958 00:41:35.500 --> 00:41:35.000 >> Now, from also from a networking stock as well, although it's 959 00:41:35.500 --> 00:41:35.000 Rick is my friend. I'm good. 960 00:41:35.500 --> 00:41:39.000 >> Now, from also from a networking stock as well, although it's 961 00:41:39.500 --> 00:41:43.000 on the file server side of things, SMB3 massive, massive changes 962 00:41:43.500 --> 00:41:48.000 happened from 2008 R2 to 2012. Basically SMB3 came out. 963 00:41:48.500 --> 00:41:51.000 It's been in chromatid a small number, I think it's 3.01 or 3.02 964 00:41:51.500 --> 00:41:52.000 or something like that. 965 00:41:52.500 --> 00:41:58.000 >> I mean, let's make no mistake here, from SMB 2.2 to SMB 3, 966 00:41:58.500 --> 00:42:03.000 was about 15 versions worth of change. You want to boil it down 967 00:42:03.500 --> 00:42:08.000 to one thing, right. What did SMB 3 do that SMB 2, didn't? 968 00:42:08.500 --> 00:42:14.000 One scenario, SMB supports server based file shares. 969 00:42:14.500 --> 00:42:15.000 >> Right. 970 00:42:15.500 --> 00:42:17.000 >> And that's a really bad way to describe it because...... 971 00:42:17.500 --> 00:42:19.000 they're all server based. 972 00:42:19.500 --> 00:42:21.000 >> Server data on the file share. 973 00:42:21.500 --> 00:42:22.000 >> Work loads. 974 00:42:22.500 --> 00:42:24.000 >> Server work loads on file shares. Server files on file shares. 975 00:42:24.500 --> 00:42:25.000 Files that are opened... 976 00:42:25.500 --> 00:42:28.000 >> Your virtualization VHD files. 977 00:42:28.500 --> 00:42:32.000 >> Files that are opened and locked and working for years at a time. 978 00:42:32.500 --> 00:42:36.000 Not while you save the word doc. 979 00:42:36.500 --> 00:42:38.000 And that scenario enables so much. 980 00:42:38.500 --> 00:42:41.000 >> Multiple sessions into that data point. Multiple servers having 981 00:42:41.500 --> 00:42:44.000 that open at the same time. Being able to hand stuff back and 982 00:42:44.500 --> 00:42:45.000 forth without dropping. 983 00:42:45.500 --> 00:42:46.000 >> More so. 984 00:42:46.500 --> 00:42:48.000 >> Phenomenal stuff. We're both storage guys. We love it. 985 00:42:48.500 --> 00:42:49.000 We love it. 986 00:42:49.500 --> 00:42:54.000 >> And then finally the last bit is management and back-up. 987 00:42:54.500 --> 00:42:57.000 We'll talk about VHDX files, the changes there. The quality 988 00:42:57.500 --> 00:43:00.000 of service, and also some on-line cloud services as well. 989 00:43:00.500 --> 00:43:04.000 And you mentioned this earlier, save this again for the storage 990 00:43:04.500 --> 00:43:08.000 area but the biggest change from 2012 to 2012 R2 is the ability 991 00:43:08.500 --> 00:43:12.000 to go through and have tiers of performance inside a storage 992 00:43:12.500 --> 00:43:18.000 space of mixed drive media, S S D and spindle. That's basically 993 00:43:18.500 --> 00:43:21.000 the differentiator between a tier you're able to establish. 994 00:43:21.500 --> 00:43:24.000 >> Do not confuse this from caching. 995 00:43:24.500 --> 00:43:24.000 >> This is different. 996 00:43:24.500 --> 00:43:26.000 >> Caching is something different. We'll dig into more of that 997 00:43:26.500 --> 00:43:31.000 when we do the storage section. Tearing is a phenomenal improvement 998 00:43:31.500 --> 00:43:33.000 that allows you to have you know the term that's tossed around 999 00:43:33.500 --> 00:43:38.000 is low cost per IOP. Keep dollars per IOP down because when you're 1000 00:43:38.500 --> 00:43:42.000 measuring storage cost in a large data center, that's typically 1001 00:43:42.500 --> 00:43:45.000 what you're looking at is what's the dollars per IOP, how many 1002 00:43:45.500 --> 00:43:48.000 IOPs do I get and what does that cost me? If you get that number 1003 00:43:48.500 --> 00:43:53.000 down, then you save a lot of money. Storage is for most people's I.T. 1004 00:43:53.500 --> 00:43:58.000 budgets, 60 percent, thereabouts. It is for mine. 1005 00:43:58.500 --> 00:44:02.000 As we start to migrate our services on to some of these new things 1006 00:44:02.500 --> 00:44:06.000 in 2012, 2012 R2 we're seeing that dollar per IOP figure get 1007 00:44:06.500 --> 00:44:07.000 cut in half. 1008 00:44:07.500 --> 00:44:08.000 >> Yep. 1009 00:44:08.500 --> 00:44:11.000 >> Without any loss of performance and in fact, with gains of 1010 00:44:11.500 --> 00:44:16.000 flexibility so lots on tearing as we dig in a little bit later on. 1011 00:44:16.500 --> 00:44:19.000 We'll show you some cool demos. You'll see the tiers move around 1012 00:44:19.500 --> 00:44:22.000 and then we'll dive into what the actual difference between caching 1013 00:44:22.500 --> 00:44:26.000 and tearing is and when you potentially use one versus the other. 1014 00:44:26.500 --> 00:44:27.000 There you go. 1015 00:44:27.500 --> 00:44:30.000 >> Very cool stuff on the storage tearing side of things. 1016 00:44:30.500 --> 00:44:33.000 We've got some... he's teased me with a demo performance thing 1017 00:44:33.500 --> 00:44:36.000 last night as we're getting ready for this, and I don't even 1018 00:44:36.500 --> 00:44:38.000 know what it's going to be. 1019 00:44:38.500 --> 00:44:43.000 >> So you go and I mentioned this before, so if you Tech Ed just ended. 1020 00:44:43.500 --> 00:44:48.000 If you go on-line MSTN.com/events/Tech 1021 00:44:48.500 --> 00:44:50.000 Ed, and you can pick North America or Europe. 1022 00:44:50.500 --> 00:44:52.000 >> Or North America at MSTechEd.com. 1023 00:44:52.500 --> 00:44:53.000 >> Yeah. That works. 1024 00:44:53.500 --> 00:44:56.000 >> I'm just saying. So either one of those you can watch the sessions. 1025 00:44:56.500 --> 00:44:59.000 There's a lot of sessions that folks did some really cool performance 1026 00:44:59.500 --> 00:45:03.000 demos on storage tearing. We've got some video snips if we have 1027 00:45:03.500 --> 00:45:05.000 time, and we'll kind of pull and we'll just take a look at so 1028 00:45:05.500 --> 00:45:09.000 you can see them, but we wanted to do as we went through this 1029 00:45:09.500 --> 00:45:11.000 stuff that wasn't done there. 1030 00:45:11.500 --> 00:45:12.000 >> Uh-huh. 1031 00:45:12.500 --> 00:45:14.000 >> Because otherwise we're just repeating the same stuff over 1032 00:45:14.500 --> 00:45:16.000 and over again and that's really not... that's not doing you 1033 00:45:16.500 --> 00:45:18.000 guys a justice. 1034 00:45:18.500 --> 00:45:20.000 So I did, I came up with a little cool storage tearing demo. 1035 00:45:20.500 --> 00:45:22.000 I think you'll really dig. 1036 00:45:22.500 --> 00:45:22.000 >> Okay. 1037 00:45:22.500 --> 00:45:22.000 I think you'll really dig. 1038 00:45:22.500 --> 00:45:24.000 >> But you'll have to wait to find out. 1039 00:45:24.500 --> 00:45:27.000 >> Okay. Someone was talking about actually in the chat rooms 1040 00:45:27.500 --> 00:45:32.000 about replication with being able to set up a replica in hyper-V 1041 00:45:32.500 --> 00:45:34.000 from box A to box B. 1042 00:45:34.500 --> 00:45:35.000 >> We're going to cover that in... 1043 00:45:35.500 --> 00:45:38.000 >> We're going to be covering that in virtualization. And to box... 1044 00:45:38.500 --> 00:45:39.000 we'll get there. 1045 00:45:39.500 --> 00:45:42.000 >> Well, I was going to say it now is able to go off and do to 1046 00:45:42.500 --> 00:45:45.000 a third level and we even have the ability to go through and 1047 00:45:45.500 --> 00:45:49.000 have an outside monitoring solution. 1048 00:45:49.500 --> 00:45:52.000 Azure hyper-V recovery manager is the name of it. That ties 1049 00:45:52.500 --> 00:45:55.000 in your system center environment that can go through and coordinate 1050 00:45:55.500 --> 00:45:59.000 the moving of resources from one particular data center to the other. 1051 00:45:59.500 --> 00:46:02.000 Now, the data doesn't actually move up to Azure and down again. 1052 00:46:02.500 --> 00:46:05.000 It simply is coordinating the replication between the two different 1053 00:46:05.500 --> 00:46:08.000 sites, and then handles health monitoring. If there's a problem 1054 00:46:08.500 --> 00:46:11.000 with it then goes in and kicks off the automated process to basically 1055 00:46:11.500 --> 00:46:15.000 fail it over to the other side. So very, very cool stuff. 1056 00:46:15.500 --> 00:46:17.000 And just to be absolutely clear because this slide was not made 1057 00:46:17.500 --> 00:46:22.000 by myself, it does say Exchange on the bottom of that, and Exchange, 1058 00:46:22.500 --> 00:46:25.000 if you talk to any Exchange product teams, Exchange does not 1059 00:46:25.500 --> 00:46:25.000 product hyper-V replica because it has its own Exchange systems. 1060 00:46:25.500 --> 00:46:25.000 if you talk to any Exchange product teams, Exchange does not 1061 00:46:25.500 --> 00:46:29.000 product hyper-V replica because it has its own Exchange systems. 1062 00:46:29.500 --> 00:46:32.000 >> Exchange... they've always been a little stumped when it comes 1063 00:46:32.500 --> 00:46:35.000 to virtualization for some reason. They've been a little... 1064 00:46:35.500 --> 00:46:35.000 I don't know. 1065 00:46:35.500 --> 00:46:36.000 to virtualization for some reason. They've been a little... 1066 00:46:36.500 --> 00:46:40.000 >> It is a first class citizen. Best workload on hyper-V. 1067 00:46:40.500 --> 00:46:42.000 We've run it best and the fastest. Just some of the advanced 1068 00:46:42.500 --> 00:46:45.000 functionality we have for instance the replica isn't supported 1069 00:46:45.500 --> 00:46:47.000 because of the way they write through the database, and they 1070 00:46:47.500 --> 00:46:50.000 don't have the ability to go off and change this just like this 1071 00:46:50.500 --> 00:46:53.000 so basically you're at this point in time there was a question 1072 00:46:53.500 --> 00:46:53.000 that came up in the chat room, is Exchange supported as a hyper-V 1073 00:46:53.500 --> 00:46:53.000 so basically you're at this point in time there was a question 1074 00:46:53.500 --> 00:46:55.000 that came up in the chat room, is Exchange supported as a hyper-V 1075 00:46:55.500 --> 00:46:58.000 replica candidate from one to the other by the Exchange team. 1076 00:46:58.500 --> 00:47:00.000 The answer, no, it's not. 1077 00:47:00.500 --> 00:47:04.000 >> Here's the really important thing too. Because this is always 1078 00:47:04.500 --> 00:47:06.000 caused contention. I regularly talk to customers, and they talk 1079 00:47:06.500 --> 00:47:10.000 about their virtualization vendors, and they talk to Microsoft 1080 00:47:10.500 --> 00:47:13.000 and they ask the question is this supported and Microsoft goes 1081 00:47:13.500 --> 00:47:17.000 no, and someone else goes yes. The definition of supported according 1082 00:47:17.500 --> 00:47:22.000 to Microsoft is you can call the 1-800 hotline, and they will 1083 00:47:22.500 --> 00:47:25.000 say yes we'll help you. Not it will work. 1084 00:47:25.500 --> 00:47:25.000 >> Right. 1085 00:47:25.500 --> 00:47:25.000 say yes we'll help you. Not it will work. 1086 00:47:25.500 --> 00:47:29.000 >> There is a ton of stuff that will work that not supported that 1087 00:47:29.500 --> 00:47:33.000 by other definitions is called supported. So supported, you 1088 00:47:33.500 --> 00:47:37.000 know got to clarify that. You know, yes, it will work. 1089 00:47:37.500 --> 00:47:40.000 Okay, well, if I call you will you fix it if it broke. 1090 00:47:40.500 --> 00:47:43.000 Well, then it's not supported. It's functions. 1091 00:47:43.500 --> 00:47:44.000 >> Right. 1092 00:47:44.500 --> 00:47:50.000 >> And everything functions under hyper-V but it's not all supported. 1093 00:47:50.500 --> 00:47:51.000 Important clarity point. 1094 00:47:51.500 --> 00:47:54.000 >> Management is the next section that we're going to be covering. 1095 00:47:54.500 --> 00:47:56.000 This actually has been a big update in R2. 1096 00:47:56.500 --> 00:47:58.000 That's where we're going to be talking about standards based 1097 00:47:58.500 --> 00:48:02.000 management with obviously with the management framework. 1098 00:48:02.500 --> 00:48:05.000 It's basically a consistent framework that now all the different 1099 00:48:05.500 --> 00:48:09.000 management functionality from both the developer's perspective 1100 00:48:09.500 --> 00:48:12.000 and I.T. perspective and automation perspective ties into the 1101 00:48:12.500 --> 00:48:14.000 WMF and then down to the different parts you're going to go off 1102 00:48:14.500 --> 00:48:18.000 and manage at a single manage point. Multiple service manager. 1103 00:48:18.500 --> 00:48:20.000 We'll be doing some brief stuff with systems center but we'll 1104 00:48:20.500 --> 00:48:23.000 be leaving the systems system to next week's Jumpstart. 1105 00:48:23.500 --> 00:48:26.000 >> Yep. We'll also be doing some things with service manager as well. 1106 00:48:26.500 --> 00:48:30.000 It's a massive update and most people that I've seen that have 1107 00:48:30.500 --> 00:48:34.000 deployed 2012 are not using server manager anywhere to the potential 1108 00:48:34.500 --> 00:48:35.000 they could. 1109 00:48:35.500 --> 00:48:37.000 >> Which is crazy to me. And you should be running that server 1110 00:48:37.500 --> 00:48:42.000 manager tool on a Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 workstation, not from 1111 00:48:42.500 --> 00:48:45.000 the console of the server because you can do everything from 1112 00:48:45.500 --> 00:48:49.000 the remote Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 client to those servers that 1113 00:48:49.500 --> 00:48:49.000 you're managing and it also does down level management of previous 1114 00:48:49.500 --> 00:48:49.000 the remote Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 client to those servers that 1115 00:48:49.500 --> 00:48:51.000 you're managing and it also does down level management of previous 1116 00:48:51.500 --> 00:48:57.000 versions down to 2008 versions. As well. And then finally, automation. 1117 00:48:57.500 --> 00:49:00.000 Obviously with Powershell we'll be talking about desired state configuration. 1118 00:49:00.500 --> 00:49:04.000 We'll be talking about the new robustness of Powershell. An extra 1119 00:49:04.500 --> 00:49:08.000 couple of hundred Powershell cmdlets have been added to 2012 R2. 1120 00:49:08.500 --> 00:49:09.000 >> You want to see that right now. 1121 00:49:09.500 --> 00:49:12.000 >> Sure, man if you've got some slides. 1122 00:49:12.500 --> 00:49:14.000 >> So Powershell, right so the big thing we're going to show tomorrow 1123 00:49:14.500 --> 00:49:14.000 with Powershell is desired state configuration and so we'll obviously 1124 00:49:14.500 --> 00:49:14.000 >> So Powershell, right so the big thing we're going to show tomorrow 1125 00:49:14.500 --> 00:49:17.000 with Powershell is desired state configuration and so we'll obviously 1126 00:49:17.500 --> 00:49:21.000 get to that tomorrow, but one of the cool little things they've 1127 00:49:21.500 --> 00:49:24.000 added with Powershell. There's not a lot that's changed in the 1128 00:49:24.500 --> 00:49:27.000 language of Powershell. Syntax and the structure for Powershell 1129 00:49:27.500 --> 00:49:33.000 4 which is R2 8.1 for Powershell 3 which was R2 in 8, with 2012 1130 00:49:33.500 --> 00:49:37.000 R2 and 8. 2012 and Windows 8. 1131 00:49:37.500 --> 00:49:42.000 It's a little bit of an alphabet soup here. There's a lot of syntaxual... 1132 00:49:42.500 --> 00:49:42.000 if that's a word. 1133 00:49:42.500 --> 00:49:43.000 >> Is that a word? 1134 00:49:43.500 --> 00:49:48.000 >> It is now. Syntaxual changes for Powershell. But one of the 1135 00:49:48.500 --> 00:49:52.000 neat little nifty things they added was with Powershell web access. 1136 00:49:52.500 --> 00:49:55.000 If you've never seen Powershell web access this was their 2012 1137 00:49:55.500 --> 00:49:59.000 but there's a new little thing in R2 which I'll go ahead and 1138 00:49:59.500 --> 00:50:04.000 log on and just hit a server on the network. 1139 00:50:04.500 --> 00:50:06.000 So this is you know Powershell in a web browser. 1140 00:50:06.500 --> 00:50:07.000 >> Uh-huh. 1141 00:50:07.500 --> 00:50:07.000 >> Which makes the security guys go crazy. 1142 00:50:07.500 --> 00:50:07.000 >> Uh-huh. 1143 00:50:07.500 --> 00:50:10.000 >> Which makes the security guys go crazy. 1144 00:50:10.500 --> 00:50:12.000 >> It's done through cells. 1145 00:50:12.500 --> 00:50:15.000 >> On all of the standard security parameters associated with 1146 00:50:15.500 --> 00:50:19.000 the machines. But Powershell cmdlets... 1147 00:50:19.500 --> 00:50:21.000 >> But if you go to your non-Windows security guy and say hey 1148 00:50:21.500 --> 00:50:24.000 I want to put a command line that access everything publishes 1149 00:50:24.500 --> 00:50:27.000 via a web server they get all squirrelly. You've just got to 1150 00:50:27.500 --> 00:50:30.000 explain it's really okay. 1151 00:50:30.500 --> 00:50:32.000 So this is Powershell in a web browser, and if I go... 1152 00:50:32.500 --> 00:50:35.000 >> Any standards based web browser this will work in by the way. 1153 00:50:35.500 --> 00:50:43.000 >> HTML 5. Here's the name of my server when I consider a variable. 1154 00:50:43.500 --> 00:50:44.000 >> There you go. 1155 00:50:44.500 --> 00:50:47.000 >> Which okay, that's about the world's dumbest Powershell demo. 1156 00:50:47.500 --> 00:50:51.000 But there's a new button called save, and what that does it disconnects 1157 00:50:51.500 --> 00:50:55.000 me from 1158 00:50:55.500 --> 00:51:00.000 Powershell, but 1159 00:51:00.500 --> 00:51:04.000 it saves the session. 1160 00:51:04.500 --> 00:51:06.000 So I can now go back and log-in again. 1161 00:51:06.500 --> 00:51:11.000 >> Same user, same machine you're trying to get to? 1162 00:51:11.500 --> 00:51:14.000 >> Go back to the same server. What it's going to do now hey you've 1163 00:51:14.500 --> 00:51:17.000 already got a session running, and I click it and I go cool, 1164 00:51:17.500 --> 00:51:20.000 here's my session, and there's my variable again. 1165 00:51:20.500 --> 00:51:22.000 >> Nice, so you pick it up right where you left off. 1166 00:51:22.500 --> 00:51:22.000 >> Now, here's why that's important. A lot of people say... 1167 00:51:22.500 --> 00:51:22.000 >> Nice, so you pick it up right where you left off. 1168 00:51:22.500 --> 00:51:24.000 >> Now, here's why that's important. A lot of people say... 1169 00:51:24.500 --> 00:51:28.000 when I first show Powershell web access, Powershell web access, 1170 00:51:28.500 --> 00:51:33.000 cool, great, but where would I ever use this? 1171 00:51:33.500 --> 00:51:37.000 Think as you move to cloud scenarios where you no longer have 1172 00:51:37.500 --> 00:51:40.000 R P.C. type of access and you don't have WSMAN type access. 1173 00:51:40.500 --> 00:51:45.000 All you've got is SSL, HTTPS. This allows you to shove Powershell 1174 00:51:45.500 --> 00:51:49.000 and everything about Powershell over essentially web friendly connections. 1175 00:51:49.500 --> 00:51:49.000 >> Yeah. 1176 00:51:49.500 --> 00:51:53.000 >> Which can get you into places, you may not have been been able 1177 00:51:53.500 --> 00:51:57.000 to get into before because of all of the layers and rules and whatnot. 1178 00:51:57.500 --> 00:52:00.000 So that's all fine and good. So if you're run a management tool 1179 00:52:00.500 --> 00:52:03.000 that goes against Powershell web access or graphical tool, but 1180 00:52:03.500 --> 00:52:06.000 you're going over a WAN link so the connections not trustworthy 1181 00:52:06.500 --> 00:52:09.000 and the connection goes down and the tool crashes. This allows 1182 00:52:09.500 --> 00:52:12.000 you a tool to handle disconnects. 1183 00:52:12.500 --> 00:52:13.000 >> Yeah. 1184 00:52:13.500 --> 00:52:15.000 >> So for you as an administrator you're probably not going to 1185 00:52:15.500 --> 00:52:18.000 do this. But if you're ISV and looking at building Powershell 1186 00:52:18.500 --> 00:52:22.000 based admin tools, then this is a really neat thing you want 1187 00:52:22.500 --> 00:52:25.000 to take a look at because it allows you to build essentially 1188 00:52:25.500 --> 00:52:30.000 a connectionless admin tool that can connect, send a bunch of 1189 00:52:30.500 --> 00:52:33.000 Powershell, let it run the session, and then disconnection. 1190 00:52:33.500 --> 00:52:37.000 Or maybe not a disconnect but a hand delay disconnect, and reconnect, 1191 00:52:37.500 --> 00:52:40.000 and pick up where you left off. So you can actually build some 1192 00:52:40.500 --> 00:52:44.000 really neat tools around this and if I were a betting man, which 1193 00:52:44.500 --> 00:52:47.000 I'm not typically, but sometimes I am, and this is purely 100 1194 00:52:47.500 --> 00:52:50.000 percent my speculation, I'd say you're going to see... 1195 00:52:50.500 --> 00:52:52.000 >> You want to get speculation. 1196 00:52:52.500 --> 00:52:56.000 >> I'm not speculating. You work for Microsoft, I don't. I think 1197 00:52:56.500 --> 00:52:56.000 down the road you'll see server managers in something like this. 1198 00:52:56.500 --> 00:52:56.000 >> I'm not speculating. You work for Microsoft, I don't. I think 1199 00:52:56.500 --> 00:52:59.000 down the road you'll see server managers in something like this. 1200 00:52:59.500 --> 00:53:01.000 I really do. I think that the down the road... I don't think 1201 00:53:01.500 --> 00:53:03.000 it's going to be in R2. I think down the road you're going to 1202 00:53:03.500 --> 00:53:07.000 see server manager in R2 in order to do stuff because it makes sense. 1203 00:53:07.500 --> 00:53:09.000 That's my suggestion. 1204 00:53:09.500 --> 00:53:12.000 >> Okay. As a transition point off of that, someone actually asked 1205 00:53:12.500 --> 00:53:15.000 about being able to run Windows Server client manager on Windows 7. 1206 00:53:15.500 --> 00:53:16.000 The answer is no. 1207 00:53:16.500 --> 00:53:16.000 >> No. 1208 00:53:16.500 --> 00:53:20.000 >> We always make our RSAT tools specifically to the version of 1209 00:53:20.500 --> 00:53:22.000 the server that matches up to the client version as well. 1210 00:53:22.500 --> 00:53:28.000 So if you want to manage 2012 R2 box, you need to have an 8.1 1211 00:53:28.500 --> 00:53:31.000 workstation running the RSAT tool specifically for it, but it's 1212 00:53:31.500 --> 00:53:37.000 able to manage 2012 R2 and 2012 and 2008 and 2008 R2 systems. 1213 00:53:37.500 --> 00:53:41.000 If you want to manage 2012 and you have an 8 box, then you have 1214 00:53:41.500 --> 00:53:46.000 to have the RSAT tools for 2012 on to your 8 box. That's a workstation. 1215 00:53:46.500 --> 00:53:51.000 And someone was also asking about the Powershell environment 1216 00:53:51.500 --> 00:53:55.000 and in case you're wondering there is a Jumpstart coming up July 1217 00:53:55.500 --> 00:54:02.000 18th with Jeffrey SNOEFR and some M.V.P.s doing a whole day on Powershell. 1218 00:54:02.500 --> 00:54:04.000 I'm tuning in for that one. I'm actually working in the chat 1219 00:54:04.500 --> 00:54:04.000 room for that. 1220 00:54:04.500 --> 00:54:06.000 >> I'm tuning in for that one too. I'm very interested in it. 1221 00:54:06.500 --> 00:54:09.000 >> Anytime you can listen to Jeffrey talk... he invented Powershell, 1222 00:54:09.500 --> 00:54:11.000 10, 12 years ago. 1223 00:54:11.500 --> 00:54:12.000 >> That's great. 1224 00:54:12.500 --> 00:54:14.000 Jumping right along to the last a little bit of our section here. 1225 00:54:14.500 --> 00:54:18.000 We've got access information protection and the idea basically... 1226 00:54:18.500 --> 00:54:20.000 we're going to be joined by special guest for this one. 1227 00:54:20.500 --> 00:54:22.000 Corey is going to be taking a bit of break, and we're going to 1228 00:54:22.500 --> 00:54:23.000 be bringing on Adam hall. 1229 00:54:23.500 --> 00:54:27.000 >> Translation, you're not smart enough. Get out of there. 1230 00:54:27.500 --> 00:54:32.000 >> Nice. He'll be joining us in the afternoon of day two where 1231 00:54:32.500 --> 00:54:35.000 we're going to be talking about all of the Enterprise functionality 1232 00:54:35.500 --> 00:54:38.000 on the server side of access information protection. 1233 00:54:38.500 --> 00:54:41.000 They'll be talking about workplace join. I'll be talking about 1234 00:54:41.500 --> 00:54:45.000 work folders. We'll also be talking about direct access, active directory. 1235 00:54:45.500 --> 00:54:49.000 Active directory on Azure. Different directory Federation service. 1236 00:54:49.500 --> 00:54:52.000 Dynamic access control. All of the really good stuff is very, 1237 00:54:52.500 --> 00:54:56.000 very cool policy based access, audit of corporate environments. 1238 00:54:56.500 --> 00:54:58.000 That's going to be covered in the segment with Adam. 1239 00:54:58.500 --> 00:55:01.000 >> If you look at what is different inactive directory 2 because 1240 00:55:01.500 --> 00:55:04.000 that was a question that popped up in here. What's different 1241 00:55:04.500 --> 00:55:07.000 inactive directory R2 and the answer is in core active directory, 1242 00:55:07.500 --> 00:55:12.000 nothing huge and significant. There's a lot of incremental improvements 1243 00:55:12.500 --> 00:55:14.000 but there's no overarching. 1244 00:55:14.500 --> 00:55:17.000 >> GUI changes to the tools to be able to manage them. And that 1245 00:55:17.500 --> 00:55:17.000 sort of stuff. 1246 00:55:17.500 --> 00:55:18.000 >> Powershell updates. 1247 00:55:18.500 --> 00:55:19.000 >> Powershell updates too. 1248 00:55:19.500 --> 00:55:21.000 >> But the big set of improvements come around ADFS. 1249 00:55:21.500 --> 00:55:22.000 >> Yes. 1250 00:55:22.500 --> 00:55:26.000 >> Because as we start to move away from this notion of you know 1251 00:55:26.500 --> 00:55:29.000 if you've ever taken a Microsoft certified professional course, 1252 00:55:29.500 --> 00:55:33.000 you had this AGLP thing hammered into your head. Global groups, 1253 00:55:33.500 --> 00:55:37.000 global groups, global groups, get permissions. That world is 1254 00:55:37.500 --> 00:55:41.000 slowly disappearing as you no longer have control to the local 1255 00:55:41.500 --> 00:55:45.000 device to grant permissions. It's moving to a world that's based 1256 00:55:45.500 --> 00:55:49.000 on claims where permissions are based on attributes of the user 1257 00:55:49.500 --> 00:55:55.000 in active directory not necessarily groups that they belong to, right. 1258 00:55:55.500 --> 00:56:00.000 So ADFS is the mechanism of extending attribute based access 1259 00:56:00.500 --> 00:56:04.000 beyond the borders of your domain. So that you can take devices 1260 00:56:04.500 --> 00:56:09.000 that are not in your domain and they can through ADFS create 1261 00:56:09.500 --> 00:56:12.000 claims which are basically make statements I'm Bob, I'm in sales, 1262 00:56:12.500 --> 00:56:16.000 and I'm a level 3 sales rep but I'm approved for confidential information. 1263 00:56:16.500 --> 00:56:17.000 >> Right. 1264 00:56:17.500 --> 00:56:20.000 >> They can make those kinds of claims via authentication, and 1265 00:56:20.500 --> 00:56:22.000 you can build an access control model based on claims. 1266 00:56:22.500 --> 00:56:25.000 >> Before everyone starts running away going Laa-Laa, Laa-Laa, 1267 00:56:25.500 --> 00:56:29.000 don't want to hear this, it's able to be able to be worked together 1268 00:56:29.500 --> 00:56:33.000 in your existing control levels at the same time. You can do 1269 00:56:33.500 --> 00:56:36.000 simulation to find out if it's going to work correctly, and then 1270 00:56:36.500 --> 00:56:38.000 you can start to phase out and move stuff. 1271 00:56:38.500 --> 00:56:43.000 So I had a lot of apprehension and fear, I'm going to lose my groups. 1272 00:56:43.500 --> 00:56:45.000 I don't want to lose groups because I've been doing so much with them. 1273 00:56:45.500 --> 00:56:47.000 >> They're not going to go away unless you change. 1274 00:56:47.500 --> 00:56:51.000 >> But you now have the ability to claims based access is extremely 1275 00:56:51.500 --> 00:56:54.000 important and also very granular and you basically dynamically 1276 00:56:54.500 --> 00:56:58.000 will grant more or less rights based on how your accessing, and 1277 00:56:58.500 --> 00:57:00.000 what you're accessing it from and who you claim that you are. 1278 00:57:00.500 --> 00:57:04.000 >> It's the basis for the new state of a machine because you've 1279 00:57:04.500 --> 00:57:08.000 in the past we have I'm domain joined I'm not domain joined. 1280 00:57:08.500 --> 00:57:10.000 If I'm domain joined I'm a full-fledged citizen. If I'm not 1281 00:57:10.500 --> 00:57:13.000 a non-domain joined I'm a stranger. Now there's a middle ground 1282 00:57:13.500 --> 00:57:18.000 which is registered, which is I'm not domain joined and I'm not unknown. 1283 00:57:18.500 --> 00:57:21.000 I'm known to active directory and I can do things with that. 1284 00:57:21.500 --> 00:57:25.000 That's what is added. That's fun stuff. 1285 00:57:25.500 --> 00:57:28.000 >> Just before we get to there we're going to be talking about 1286 00:57:28.500 --> 00:57:30.000 about VDIs specifically because that's another whole section 1287 00:57:30.500 --> 00:57:34.000 beyond doing accessing information and that's beyond the domain. 1288 00:57:34.500 --> 00:57:38.000 A lot of the new stuff with VDI isn't specifically with VDI itself. 1289 00:57:38.500 --> 00:57:41.000 It's actually with all the now supported new changes under the 1290 00:57:41.500 --> 00:57:45.000 hood that's now supported, like the storage tearing, the duplication 1291 00:57:45.500 --> 00:57:47.000 that sort of stuff that can take place. That's where a lot of 1292 00:57:47.500 --> 00:57:51.000 the new improvements have come from down underneath the VDI. 1293 00:57:51.500 --> 00:57:55.000 The look I look at VDI it's almost like a cloud service because 1294 00:57:55.500 --> 00:57:58.000 it takes advantage of all of the stuff that runs under the hood 1295 00:57:58.500 --> 00:58:04.000 within Windows, with storage, with networking, with virtualization, 1296 00:58:04.500 --> 00:58:06.000 and if you've not looked at VDI in 2012 you're going to get to 1297 00:58:06.500 --> 00:58:10.000 see what it's all in there. A lot of it is very similar to R2. 1298 00:58:10.500 --> 00:58:14.000 There's no big massive overarching changes. They all came in 2012. 1299 00:58:14.500 --> 00:58:17.000 So we'll go through all of this and show... get how you step 1300 00:58:17.500 --> 00:58:21.000 through user VHDs, pool VHDs, private VHDs, management tools 1301 00:58:21.500 --> 00:58:25.000 are different. So we'll get a chance to look at all of that. 1302 00:58:25.500 --> 00:58:27.000 And remote effects. And now, there's a funny thing there's a 1303 00:58:27.500 --> 00:58:31.000 guy in the chat room called Cauley and he's a security guy and 1304 00:58:31.500 --> 00:58:33.000 he's concerned about groups and now he's freaking out about dynamic 1305 00:58:33.500 --> 00:58:37.000 access so you've upset him, man. I'm just saying, it's not immediate. 1306 00:58:37.500 --> 00:58:40.000 The support is there. You can phase it in and understand how 1307 00:58:40.500 --> 00:58:45.000 it works and have a... it's actually... and it ends up being 1308 00:58:45.500 --> 00:58:48.000 a more secure environment. Just because it exists doesn't mean 1309 00:58:48.500 --> 00:58:50.000 you have to do it. 1310 00:58:50.500 --> 00:58:52.000 >> Right. You can still use the old way of doing stuff, and this 1311 00:58:52.500 --> 00:58:56.000 is simply a new extra tool in your toolbox to be able to use. 1312 00:58:56.500 --> 00:58:59.000 >> Exactly. Just like high-def TVs and cool cars. Just because 1313 00:58:59.500 --> 00:59:01.000 they exist doesn't mean you have to use them. 1314 00:59:01.500 --> 00:59:05.000 >> Yeah. You know what, I think we're at the very end, my friend. 1315 00:59:05.500 --> 00:59:06.000 >> Awesome. 1316 00:59:06.500 --> 00:59:10.000 >> We have just a couple of minutes left. Again, if you're asking 1317 00:59:10.500 --> 00:59:12.000 questions inside the chat room I am able to go off and answer 1318 00:59:12.500 --> 00:59:17.000 them and I will do that more when we get get in more content. 1319 00:59:17.500 --> 00:59:20.000 This was our overview section just talking about all the different 1320 00:59:20.500 --> 00:59:23.000 pieces that are there and we're going to be covering the next 1321 00:59:23.500 --> 00:59:26.000 few days, and it also includes some nice cool demos as well. 1322 00:59:26.500 --> 00:59:26.000 >> Yep. 1323 00:59:26.500 --> 00:59:28.000 >> And covered all of the major areas. Fundamental changes to 1324 00:59:28.500 --> 00:59:33.000 storage, to virtualization, to networking, and then also incremental 1325 00:59:33.500 --> 00:59:33.000 changes inside those as well based on 2012 and 2012 R2, and then 1326 00:59:33.500 --> 00:59:33.000 storage, to virtualization, to networking, and then also incremental 1327 00:59:33.500 --> 00:59:37.000 changes inside those as well based on 2012 and 2012 R2, and then 1328 00:59:37.500 --> 00:59:42.000 bringing in all of the stuff for access and information for AIP. 1329 00:59:42.500 --> 00:59:44.000 Bringing in the stuff for VDI. Bringing in stuff the for networking. 1330 00:59:44.500 --> 00:59:48.000 So it's a big smattering of stuff that's out there. 1331 00:59:48.500 --> 00:59:52.000 Resource wise, again this little slide here to the side. 1332 00:59:52.500 --> 00:59:56.000 Microsoft virtual academy has previously recorded content on 1333 00:59:56.500 --> 00:59:59.000 server 2012. A lot of the stuff we're going to be talking about 1334 00:59:59.500 --> 01:00:02.000 is applicable to 2012. This is an incremental approach up on 1335 01:00:02.500 --> 01:00:05.000 top of that. And if you want to go off and download the stuff 1336 01:00:05.500 --> 01:00:08.000 yourself AKA.MS/2012R2 1337 01:00:08.500 --> 01:00:15.000 and for systems center. 2012 R2 it is AKA.MS/SC2012R2. 1338 01:00:15.500 --> 01:00:18.000 So I say we have a little bit of a break to get set up for the 1339 01:00:18.500 --> 01:00:20.000 next section so I think we're going to be taking a ten-minute 1340 01:00:20.500 --> 01:00:23.000 break to be able to switch between these guys. Don't drop off 1341 01:00:23.500 --> 01:00:25.000 the lines. Stay in the chat room. We'll be able to go off and 1342 01:00:25.500 --> 01:00:29.000 connection up with you there. And we'll get ready to get started. 1343 01:00:29.500 --> 01:00:31.000 >> Our next section is going to be talking about? 1344 01:00:31.500 --> 01:00:31.000 >> Virtualization. 1345 01:00:31.500 --> 01:00:37.000 >> Virtualization, a whole section on vert. I can't wait. 1346 01:00:37.500 --> 02:00:00.000 See you soon.